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BARBOUR'S 

PRIZE NEEDLEWORK SERIES 






A TREATISE ON 
LACE AAKING 
EABROIDERY 
and NEEDLEWORK 

IRISH FLAX 
THREADS 



No. 4 



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Published by 

Tme Barbour Brothers Coaxpany 

BOOK. No FOUR i§ 9 5 

price: ioce^ts 

NEW YORK. BOSTON. PHILADELPHIA. CHICAGO. 

CINCINNATI. ST. LOUIS. SAN FRANCISCO. 



BARBOUR'S IRISH FLAX THREADS 

Received Highest Awards at the World's Fair, 1893. 



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u\haryAnn i> einecke 
(Decoratii/ecArr 
Qofleflioru 



STEALING 
AND FRANCiNE 

C1AR1C 
ART INSTITUTE 
L1BRART 



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EXHIBIT OF BARBOUR'S IRISH LINEN THREADS 
IN MANUFACTURES BUILDING. 



SPECIAL MERITS. 



Prize Needle-Work, Series No. 4. 



NARCISSUS DESIGN. 

THE Narcissus is a favorite flower with all needle-workers, com- 
mended by its simplicity of outline and the ease with which 
it may be transferred to any fabric, no less than by its effect- 
iveness. The design shown by the colored illustration is from the 
original, for the production of which Shade Nos. i, 3, 10 and 21 
Barbour's Ulster Rope Linen Floss were used. It may be applied 
to the decoration of many articles of home use and ornament. A 
portiere of snuff-brown linen recently noticed had a similar design 
repeated to form a "growing border," for frieze and dado. It 
was wrought in the shades given of Ulster Rope Linen, and any- 
thing more artistic than the rich golden blossoms, blending into 
orange, with the long slender leaves in the tender shades of 
green, can not well be imagined. The portiere was finished with 
a knotted fringe of the Rope Linen combining the several colors 
used, made by hand of the pure flax thread. The suggestion may be 
most artistically carried out in the production of window draperies, 
choosing an ecru or white linen for foundation, and for the straight 
valance or lambrequin which is again obtaining for mantels and 
windows. 

A new use is being made of Kensington embroidery by ladies 
who take as much pride in the products of the needle as does the 
artist in those of the brush ; pieces of work are handsomely framed 
and hung as are paintings in parlor, drawing-room and chamber. 
With the wide range of shades developed in Ulster Floss, any color- 
ing which may be obtained by the artist in oils is possible. What 
could be more artistic than "a yard of daffodils/' produced by a 
repetition of the design given ? 



Prize Needle-Work, Series No. 4. 




That all " &A 

y° ur 4&* 

Linen ilk La/ 
thread 9 '$8588? 
carries - -^f^T 
this Trade-Mark. 



NARCISSUS DESIGN. 



BOOK NO. 4. 

BARBOUR'S 

PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



A TREATISE 



ON 



LACE-MAKING, EMBROIDERY, AND NEEDLE-WORK 




PUBLISHED BY 

THE BARBOUR BROTHERS COMPANY, 

1895. 



BOOKS No. i, No. 2, No. 3, 

AND 

BOOK OF INSTRUCTION FOR MACRAME LACE MAKING 

are still in print, and will be sent to any address upon receipt of ten 
cents each. In addition to Patterns for work, they contain general 
directions for Crocheting, Knitting, Antique or Guipure Lace, Darned 
or Embroidered Net, Tatting, Embroidery, and instructions how to 
properly wash Embroidery and Tatting. 



If consumers find difficulty in procuring Barbour's Linen Thread 
from their local stores, it will be sent from The Barbour Brothers 
Company, New York, to any address, postage paid, upon receipt of 
stamps or silver, as follows : 

3-cord, 200-yards spools, dark blue, white, whited 

brown (or ecru), and drabs 10 cents ea. spool. 

3-cord, carpet thread, any color ..... 5 " " skein. 

00 Ulster rope linen floss, any color, 80 shades, 5 " " " 

No. 4, etching flax, any color, 80 shades . . 5 " 2 skeins. 
Crochet thread, balls, gray, cream, and white. 

Nos. 16, 18, 20, and 25 15 cents per ball. 

Nos. 30, 35, 40, and 50 20 

Nos. 60 and 70 . 25 



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Copyright, 1895, 

BY ttocftfoell anti CJjurrijill 

The Barbour Brothers Company. BOSTON 



CONTENTS 



INTRODUCTION . . . 
COLORS OF FLOWERS 



TAGE 

• 4 

• 9 



DEPARTMENT i: 

Lisburn Lace n 

Kelsey Lace 14 

Daisy Lace, with Corner . 17 

Guipure Lace and Insertion, 19 

Lace Flounce, for Waist . 22 

Novelty Lace, with Corner . 23 

Reticella Wheel .... 25 

Martha Lace 26 

Tatted Point Edge . . .27 

DEPARTMENT 2: 

Sofa Pillow in Rococco 

Crochet 29 

Doily 31 

Rose and Leaf Doily . . 33 

Tumbler Doily 35 

Hexagon Table-Mats . . 37 
Buffet Scarf, in Ideal Hon- 

iton Crochet 39 

Sideboard Scarf, with Gui- 
pure Lace and Insertion . 41 
Servette, with Crochet Ap- 
plique .43 

V-Shaped Yoke 44 

Night-Dress Yoke .... 46 
Antique Square for Bed- 
spread 48 

Sponge Basket 50 

Ecclesiastical Girdle . . 52 
Belt in Afghan Stitch . 54 
Knitted Corner for Hand- 
kerchief 55 

Baby's Cap 59 

Collar with Vandyke Points, 62 

Reversible Doily .... 63 

DEPARTMENT 3: 

Antique Curtains .... 67 
Netted Centre-Piece or 

Tidy ........ 70 

Netted. Collar 71 

Lady's Netted Tie ... 73 



PAGE 

Bobbin Work 74 

Christina Edging .... 76 

Danish Lace and Insertion . yy 

Queen Lace 79 

Block Lace 83 

Zigzag Lace ...... 85 

Lambrequin .88 

Ulster Fringe 90 

DEPARTMENT 4: 

Scarf in Danish Antique 
Embroidery 92 

Art-Square in Bulgarian 
Embroidery 94 

Table Cover in Applique 
Embroidery 95 

Sofa Pillow in Picot Em- 
broidery 97 

Cross-Stitch Design . . . 99 

Inlaid Work 100 

DEPARTMENT 5: 

Designs for Doilies . . . 102 

Doily 102 

Maple-Leaf Doily . . . .105 
Tray-Cloth in Double Out- 
line 106 

Centre-Piece in Honiton 

and Half-Kensington . .107 
Cut- Work Design for Scarf 

End 108 

Clover Sofa Pillow . . .110 

DEPARTMENT 6: 

Centre Square, in Ulster 

Braid 112 

Centre-Piece in Old English 

Point 113 

Centre-Piece in Needle 

Honiton 116 

Plate Doily in Old English 

Point 118 

Collar in Princess Lace . 120 
Handkerchief in Irish 

Point Lace 122 

Doilies in Drawn-Work . 124 
Servette 126 




1784 ^HflaxIEH 1895 



Again we greet the friends we have made and are making through 
the medium of our " Prize Needle-work Series." To know that this 
circle is so constantly and rapidly widening is a great pleasure. It 
is no less gratifying to read the letters received from ladies in all 
parts of the country expressing appreciation of our efforts, and com- 
mendation of Barbour's Irish flax threads; for, while one's best 
should always be aimed at for its own sake, there is certainly a deep 
satisfaction in feeling that work is so highly valued by those in whose 
interest it is done. 

Credit should be given where credit belongs, however, and that 
the " Needle-work Series " is continually increasing in popularity is due 
to the superiority of its personal contributions. In these symposiums, 
representing every variety of needle-work, will be found something to 
fill any requirement ; and while we believe No. 4 will be conceded 
the palm of excellence thus far, ladies will desire to possess the 
entire series, since there is no duplication of designs. There seems 
especial cause for congratulation in the fact that the entire com- 
pendium may be classed as original with its contributors. 

We wish to call particular attention to the colored plates in this 
issue. These were made from original designs prepared by Mrs. 
Hedwig Muller, 44 West 64th Street, New York, one of the most 
efficient teachers of art needle-work in that city, and who cordially 
recommends our Irish flax threads for all classes of work. While 
the engraver has performed his task faithfully, it is beyond typo- 



publisher's notice, 



graphical art to reproduce the rich lustre, and smoothness, and 
perfect shading of the originals ; this can only be done with the 
embroidery needle, threaded with Ulster floss. We take much 
pleasure in presenting these plates, however, knowing that they can- 
not fail to please the ladies, and will make thousands of new friends 
for the flosses among those who have not known of their beauty and 
utility. To all who desire and are not able to obtain the Ulster rope 
linen and etching-flax of their dealer, we will send our new color- 
book, containing nearly eighty shade samples, on receipt of ten cents. 
This price does not cover cost of production, but will afford our 
friends opportunity to make choice of shades for any work they pur- 
pose doing. 

Attention is also called to the netted draperies, illustrated on 
page 68. While the work is not difficult, nothing can well be im- 
agined more effective than these soft, rich, heavy curtains, lustrous 
with the sheen of flax, and increasing in beauty, if possible, with 
successive launderings. The design is an original one, and the 
lady whose work it is may well feel pride in it. We may be 
pardoned, also, especial reference to the scarf in Danish antique 
embroidery, on page 93. It is a work of art, literally, and shows 
the estimation in which Barbour's Irish flax threads are held in other 
countries than our own. 

The field of flax is constantly enlarging as ladies come to recog- 
nize more and more fully its value — combining, as it does, lustre, 
strength, and smoothness — in embroidery, and lace-work of all de- 
scriptions. The peculiar appropriateness of flax for the embellish- 
ment of altar-cloths and table-linen need not be commented upon, 
while for application to the various art stuffs so much in vogue for 
table-covers, portieres, and other articles of household use and orna- 
ment, the Ulster rope linen floss stands preeminent. Scarcely a 
month passes that it is not applied to some novel idea in embroidery, 
in the evolution of which effectiveness is aimed at rather than confor- 
mation to rule. Just now the copying of blue and white china, in 
embroidery, bids fair to become a decided " fad; " and a line of 
new delf shades is being added to the generous range of colors 
already presented. We thank the ladies for many suggestions 



b BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 

received, some of them very valuable. In accordance with these, 
the Ulster etching- flax, for outlining and solid embroidery, has been 
prepared in all the shades of the Ulster rope linen floss, the new 
lace-threads, No. 120 and No. 150, have been put upon the market, 
with Barbour's honiton lace-thread, 2 -cord, No. 250, surpassing in 
smoothness and texture the French threads -so long used for fine 
needle-work. It is equal in fineness to about No, 1000 of the French 
thread. Other suggestions are under consideration; we shall be 
glad to receive them further. 

To one suggestion, not accepted, we wish to refer ; it is that our 
Irish flax threads be made in shaded colors for crocheting, as is 
done with cotton threads. We do not feel that this would be desir- 
able. There is nothing at all artistic in these productions of shaded 
thread ; indeed, to the cultivated eye they possess an abnormal 
ugliness. After laundering, such work is not even presentable, and 
the readiness with which cotton is known to soil renders its life re- 
markably ephemeral. As a lady of taste remarked in our hearing 
not long ago, " It will not look nice, even while one is working on 
it," which is very true. 

Again, and even at the risk of repetition, we must impress upon 
our friends that the flax threads alone should be used for all varie- 
ties of lace-work. Our own personal experience in the sale of 
crocheted, knitted, bobbined, and other laces emphasizes this point. 
Cotton laces are not salable, and the making of them for such 
purpose leads only to disappointment. This we have learned by 
experience, and the lesson is an important one. As has been pre- 
viously stated, the use of cotton thread in lace-work is a waste of 
time and labor. Ladies of large experience in the sale of hand- 
made laces understand this so thoroughly that they invariably stipu- 
late the variety of thread to be used in filling their orders. And 
this brings us to another point : We are preparing albums of laces 
to take orders from, and will gladly receive samples from any friends 
who may wish to place work on sale. These samples must be 
made of Barbour's Irish flax threads, the number of thread used in 
each designated, and the price per yard. Our only object is to 
assist those desiring to do so in the disposal of their handiwork, and 



PUBLISHER S NOTICE. 7 

no charge will be made unless an album is placed in a women's ex- 
change, in which case ten per cent, commission is usually deducted 
by the lady managers. 

It is probably unnecessary to suggest that any lace design in 
our Needle-work Series, for which a fine thread is specified, may be 
effectively copied in the coarser numbers, much depending on the 
use to which the trimming is to be put. No. 40, No. 50, and No. 
60 make especially rich crochet laces. Any article of needle-work 
published will be procured, to order, for those desiring it. 

The plan of purchasing articles has succeeded so admirably that 
it will be continued. As a rule, the departments of knitting, 
crocheting, tatting, etc., are more abundantly supplied than those of 
embroidery. Purchases are made at any time, so there need be no 
hesitation in sending work. It is well to suggest the length of time 
any article may be retained for other disposal in case it should not 
be suitable for our own use. We are always glad to make sale of 
work, if possible. 

Contributions must consist of sample or samples of work, with 
directions carefully written out, stating shades and size of floss, number 
of thread, size or number of needles, etc., together with the quantity of 
material required for the article in question. Samples of lace-work 
should be made from directions after the latter are written out, thus 
ensuring their absolute correctness. It is, of course, imperative that 
all work be done with Barbour's Irish flax threads. These threads 
and flosses are suited to every requirement, and ladies having once 
used them for any grade of needle-work will assuredly take no other. 
Original work will receive especial attention. If not original, con- 
tributors will kindly state from what source the design submitted 
was obtained. The quantity of lace made from a spool of thread 
should be designated, Articles will be carefully examined upon 
receipt, and, if accepted, payment will at once be made. Price must 
be plainly marked upon every article, which will be returned, 
charges prepaid, if not available. Contributions should be sent to 
The Barbour Brothers Co., Needle-work Department, 218 Church 
Street, New York, charges prepaid. Any materials or patterns of 
work used in the "Prize Needle-work Series" can be furnished, and 



8 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

the editor will gladly send information concerning such to all desir- 
ing it, on receipt of stamp. 

MARY E. BRADFORD. 

Address all communications to 

THE BARBOUR BROTHERS COMPANY, 

Needle- Work Department, 

218 Church Street, 

New York. 
September, 1895. 



departments. 

Department No. 1. — Knitted, crocheted, tatted, and Maltese (or 
hairpin) laces. 

Department No, 2. — Articles in knitted, crocheted, tatted, and 
Maltese work, other than lace, designed for use and ornament, such 
as bed-spreads, tidies, toilet-sets, purses, etc. 

Department No. J. — Netted, macrame, and bobbin (or pillow) 
work, such as lace, lambrequins, drapes, parasol-covers, etc. 

Department No. 4. — Articles in Italian, gobelin, cross-stitch, flat, 
and similar embroidery, including darned net. 

Department No. 5. — Articles in cut-work, Kensington, outline, 
Hungarian, and other embroidery of like nature. 

Department No. 6. — Articles in drawn-work, English point, or 
of any description, other than specially noted, in which the Irish 
flax threads are used to advantage. 



COLORS OF FLOWERS. 9 



COLORS OF FLOWERS. 



Ladies are sometimes puzzled to select those colors which will 
give effective results, and most faithfully represent nature. Frequently 
the selection may well be left to the saleswoman in a regular art 
needle-work department ; but for the benefit of those who have 
not this resource, or are making choice by mail, we suggest 
shades to be used in some flowers most frequently copied. A little 
study of the natural flower on the part of the needle-worker who has 
the Ulster rope linen shade-card at hand, will enable her to make 
most satisfactory selections ; and this is the wiser method, since the 
choice of shades, as below, can be but suggestive. Take the pansy, 
for example ; the colors are so varied that an error can scarcely be 
made, if one will study the natural blossoms. Small flowers or leaves 
require a less number of shades than larger ones, and sepals and 
young leaves are of lighter shades of green than larger and older 
ones. In working, as example, the wild-rose, shade from light to 
dark, beginning the outer edge of petal with the lightest shade used, 
working the edge smoothly, but taking irregular stitches toward the 
centre. With the next shade, take stitches between those first made, 
still working toward the centre of petal, thus perfectly blending the 
shades. We shall be glad to receive suggestions from ladies as to 
additional shades needed in their work. 

Apple blossoms : Shades no, in, 112, with 2 for centre. 

Asters — yellow : ^,1,2,3, and 4. 

Asters — purple: 100, 100A, 100B, 101, and 102. 

Buttercups : y 2 , 1, 2, and 3. 

Calla-lily : 40 and 1 . 

Cat-tails: 131^, 133, 134, and 81. 

Clematis — purple: 100, 100A, 100B, 101. 

Clematis — pink: 110,111,112. 

Convolvulus: 50, 51^, 52, and 53, 100, 100A, 100B, and iot. 

Daisy — white : 40 and 41, 3 for centre. 

Daisy — yellow : 4 and 4^, centre of 13. 

Dandelion : i, 2, 3, and 4. 



10 harbour's prize needle-work series. 

Geranium — red: 60, 61, 62, with 43^2 and 44; white: 40 
and 41 ; pink : 80 and 82, no, in, 112, 120, and 121. 

Golden-rod : 2, 3, 4, and 130. 

Iris: 100, 1 00 A, 100B, and 101. 

Jasmine — white : 40 and 41 ; yellow : 1,2,3, an d 4. 

Marigold : 2,3, and 4. 

Nasturtium : 2, 3, 4, 4^, 5, 6, and 7. 

Pansies: %, 1, 2, 3, 4, 4^, 5, 6, 7, 41, 42, 83, 100B, 101, 102, 
132. 

Pond-lily : 40 or 41, with 3 for centre. Leaves, 30, 30^, 31. 

Wild-roses: no, in, 112, with 10, 11, 12, 13, for leaves, or ac- 
cording to taste. 

General range of color for leaves : 10 to 21, inclusive. 

For smaller flowers use the Ulster etching-flax, size 4, which 
comes in the same shades as the rope linen. 

The Ulster rope linen floss seems peculiarly adapted to the great 
variety of embroideries, unconventional both as to design and execu- 
tion, which are growing more and more in favor. Any sort of stitch 
is permissible, or any harmonious combination of colors. " Do as 
you like, so that the result is effective," seems, in substance, the 
order of the hour among needle-workers ; and so individual 
tastes are given precedence rather than established form, and the 
embroiderer takes pride in having her work differ from that of 
others. Denims, heavy linens, etc., are multiplying with the de- 
mand for such materials, and for use upon all of these the Ulster rope 
linen floss has acquired the popular favor. 



Explanation of terms used in knitting and crocheting 
will be found on page 128. 



DEPARTMENT 1 



LISBURN LACE. 

[Contributed by Miss Mae F. Murphy, Easthampton, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 50, in balls, or 3 -cord, 
200-yards spools, and steel hook, size o. 

The leaves are made first, then the picot edge to join them, and 
lastly heading. For the leaf: 

Ch 8, join; ch 12, 1 tc in 4th st, ch i, miss 1, 1 dtc in next, ch 
1, miss 1, tc in next, ch 1, miss 1, dc in next, ch 2, 2 dc in ring. 
This completes 1st section. Next section, ch 17, tc in 5th st, 
ch 1, miss 1, dtc in next, ch 1, miss i, dtc in next, ch 1, miss 1, 
tc in next, ch 1, miss 1, stc in next, ch 1, miss 1, dc in next, ch 2, 
2 dc in ring. For 3d or middle section, ch 23, tc in 5th st, * ch 1, 
miss 1, dtc in next, repeat twice, ch 1, miss 1, tc in next, repeat 
once, ch 1, miss 1, stc in next, ch 1, miss 1, dc in next, ch 1, 
miss 1, dc in next, ch 2, 2 dc in ring. The 4th section is made 
like 2d and 5th like 1st, with 4 dc after it instead of 2. Then make 
2 dc in 1st 2 sts of 1st section, stc in next, and 1 tc in every st 
around section, working in back loop, and widening in middle st by 
putting 3 tc in it ; finish the section as begun*; work 2 sc on 2 dc 
in ring, and crochet around all the sections in same way. With 
a little care the leaflets may be given a gracefully rounding appear- 
ance, and on this much of the beauty of the work depends. When 
all the sections have been worked around, put 2 sc over 4 dc in 
ring, and you are ready for the stem : Ch 15, turn, miss 1,1 dc in 
each of next 9 sts, ch 6, miss 1, dc in each of remaining 5 sts 
(working in back part of sts) , then 1 dc in each of remaining 5 sts 
of original ch. Fasten next to 1st section, and break thread. This 
completes a leaf. Make as many as desired. 



12 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



For picot edge : Catch in end of short arm of stem, fasten in 
upper side of ist section, so it will lie flat, which will be in 5 th or 
6th tc. In making Irish point crochet it is often impossible to give 
explicit directions as to exact number of sts, and the worker uses 
her judgment. Ch 6, miss 2 tc, dc in next, ch 5, miss 2, dc in 
next, catch in corresponding st of next section (joining so that the 




Lisburn Lace. 



work will lie smooth when finished), ch 5, miss 3, dc in back of 
next 3 sts, ch 5, catch in ist to form picot, dc in back of next 3 sts, 
another picot, 3 dc, catch in middle section, * 3 dc, 1 picot, repeat 
until there are 7 picots, 3 dc, catch in next section, and around 
this make 4 picots, separated by 3 dc, with 3 dc before and after, 
catch in last section, dc in each of 3 sts, and catch in middle st of 
2d section of next leaf. Repeat directions for picot edge to end 
of lace, catching 2d picot on middle section of each leaf to 2d 



LISBURN LACE. 13 

picot of 4th section of preceding leaf. To join the last leaf, catch 
thread in short end of stem, fasten to ist section of leaf as directed 
above, ch 3, catch in 26. picot of 4th section of ist leaf (a glance 
at the illustration will make directions clear), ch 2, miss 2 sts of 
last leaf made, catch in next, ch 3, miss ist picot on middle sec- 
tion of ist leaf and fasten in next, ch 3, miss 2 sts of ist section of 
last leaf, dc in next 3 sts, fasten in next section, 3 dc, 1 picot 
(ch 2, catch in 3d picot of middle section of ist leaf, ch 2, catch 
in ist st of picot just made), then work around leaf with picot edge 
as directed, making 6 dc in last section instead of 3. Ch 4, catch 
in end of stem, ch 3, catch in 3d picot of middle section above, 
ch 3, miss 3 sts of stem, fasten in next, ch 1, catch in next picot, 
ch 3, catch in middle of stem, ch 2, catch in next picot, ch 4, fasten 
at end of stem and break thread. 

To make the heading : Fasten thread in last section of top leaf, 
ch 4, catch in end of stem, ch 6, miss 3, catch in next, ch 6, 
catch in angle, ch 6, catch in other end of stem, ch 6, miss 3 sts 
of ist section, catch in next, ch 6, miss 2, catch in next, then dc 
again in section directly opposite, ch 6, miss 2, catch in next, ch 4, 
catch in upper side of ist section of next leaf, ch 4, catch in end 
of stem, ch 5, catch back into 6 ch last made, ch 3, catch in centre 
of next 6 ch, ch 6, turn again, and catch in centre of 5 ch, ch 6, 
catch in end of stem, then repeat to end of lace. The next two 
rows are simply chs of 6 caught in centre of 6 chs of previous rows. 
The last row consists of chs of 3, caught in centre of previous chs of 
6. If desired, the chain- work may be made to resemble the popular 
laces of to-day more strongly by adding picots to the plain chs. 

This lace is somewhat tedious to make, but well repays all the 
time and care expended upon it by its beauty, durability, and rich- 
ness of appearance. A beautiful point-lace collar is made by com- 
bining the leaves with roses, shown elsewhere, or the leaves may be 
used alone for this purpose. One point is pretty to adorn the end 
of a tie. A very handsome set, collar, cuffs, and girdle, were re- 
cently crocheted in this pattern, using Barbour's Irish flax thread, 
ecru. This thread cannot be surpassed for what I consider the 
rnost exquisite of crocheted laces, " Irish Point." 



14 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

KELSEY LACE. 

[As illustrated in recent advertisements ] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 40, 3 -cord, 200-yards 
spools, and steel hook, No. 1. 

The skeleton part of this lace is crocheted first, then basted on 
stiff wrapping-paper and a network of threads worked on the wrong 
side. 

The medallions in the points are made first, and joined, then the 
figure above each ; next the figure is repeated above the last row, 
after which the heading is made, and the roll-picot edge. The 
daisies are made separate, and joined in the largest open spaces 
where the figure rows join. Will give explicit directions for the 
medallion and figure, and how to join. 

Begin medallion with 8 ch ; join. 

1. Ch 5, 9 tc with 2 ch between in ring, ch 2, and join to 3d of 
5 ch. 

2. Ch 3, tc in space, ch 3, tc in tc, ch 3, tc in tc, ch 3, dtc in 
tc, ch 3, long st (o 3) in tc, ch 3, 2 long sts (04) separated by 
3 ch in sp, ch 3, work down other side as 1st, ending with 2 dc 
in sp. 

3. 7 dc in sp, ch 10, fasten back in 1st dc, turn, fill ch with 
dc, 5 dc in sp, ch 10, fasten back in 3d dc of last scallop (counting 
back), turn, fill ch with dc, 3 dc in sp, ch 10, fasten back in 6th 
dc, fill with dc, (3 dc in sp, ch 12, fasten in 9th dc of last scallop, 
as before, fill ch with dc), repeat 3 times more, 1 dc in sp (this 
comes in the very centre, between longest sts), ch 20, fasten in 
1 2th dc of last scallop, fill with dc. Work other side of medallion 
like 1 st. Make as many medallions as wanted. They may be joined 
as worked by the scallop on each side that touches as they lie in a 
row (that which is enclosed in parentheses being the one) or 
caught together with needle and thread. 

To save space, will give directions for figure above 2d medallion, 
which will be the same as all others, save 1st and last, these being 
worked only half to make beginning and ending more even. 

Fasten thread between 2 middle scallops of broad end of 2d 
medallion, those covering 1 sp and part of next, ch 30, fasten back 



KELSEY LACE. 



15 



(always with sl-st, taking needle out of st, inserting in place desig- 
nated, and drawing dropped st through, thus making a close fasten- 
ing) into 6th st from needle, 5 dc in little loop thus made, ch 5, 
fasten in 13th st of ch, ch 5, 5 dc in same loop as before, ch 2, 




Kelsey Lace. 



fasten in 2d scallop on right-hand side of medallion, ch 2, 3 dc in 
loop, 10 dc on ch before 5 ch, and 3 dc on other side, ch 24 (on 
1st medallion 12 ch with 2 scallops would be used), fasten back 
on corresponding place of 1st figure, turn, and fill this ch with 
scallops, 3 on each side of 10 ch, fastened back in 8th dc of 
previous scallop, with 1 in centre of 15 ch with 1 dc on ch be- 



16 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

tween, as in medallion, the others having 5 dc between. The 1st 
scallop is joined to the little scroll of previous figure. Work 5 dc 
on original ch, after filling ch of 24, ch 12, fasten back on 6th, 
fill loop with 10 dc, 5 dc on ch, catch to last scallop made, 5 dc 
on ch, fasten and turn, filling remainder of 30 ch with 5 dc. Next 
section is now made, being like that over 1st medallion. 

Without cutting thread, when neatly joined, ch 18, fasten back 
into 6th, work 5 dc in loop, fasten to opposite little scroll, 5 dc in 
same loop, 5 dc on ch, ch 25, fasten back in 6th (from needle), 
5 dc in loop, ch 5, fasten in 13th ch, ch 5, 5 dc in loop, ch 2, 
fasten down on 2d scallop of medallion (left side), ch 2, 3 dc in 
loop, fill remainder of ch with dc, join to scroll and finish with dc, 
on right side, fasten well and cut thread. Work this figure over 
each medallion, also over figures just made, starting them on the 
point of each figure. This leaves an open space between figures 
which are filled in with daisies of 11 roll-sts, putting thread over 
needle 15 times. These roll-sts are very simple, although they 
may seem a little difficult to the beginner. After winding thread 
around needle, hold all between thumb and first finger, gently work- 
ing the needle back. The " knack " of making them will soon be 
acquired. 

The heading is made of rows of dc, tc, and dtc, the dc coming 
over centre of scallop figure, in order to make a straight edge. The 
last row is of tc with 5 ch between, missing 5 sts ; then make a row 
of scallops, joining as directed for medallion and scallop-figure, 
filling all with dc. 

A roll picot edge is worked around the point, each roll of 15 
loops. In the point of medallion are 3 extra long sts to make it 
deeper, and over these a clover-leaf picot, consisting of 1 roll of 
25 and 2 of 15 loops. 

By choosing a finer number of Barbour's Irish flax thread a nar- 
rower lace may be had. Any of the handsome collars or laces in 
this particular style may be readily copied in this way, the first 
being worked with chs covered with dc, then filled in with threads 
woven back and forth in any fashion liked. It is really very easy, 
although difficult to describe, and there will be little if any trouble 
experienced by one at all expert with the crochet needle. 



DAISY LACE, WITH CORNER. 17 

DAISY LACE, WITH CORNER. 

[Contributed by Hannah Middleton, Lesan, Iowa.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. ioo, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, steel hook, size 000. This makes a beautiful lace for hand- 
kerchiefs. Choose other numbers according to use for which the 
corner is designed. No. 35 makes a showy lace for table-cover or 
curtains. 

The petals of daisies are worked in afghan stitch. Ch 9, turn, 
take up each loop, keeping all on needle ; then work off 2 at 
a time until but one remains. Work back, sc in 1st st, dc in others, 
sc in 1 st ch at beginning. Make 8 more petals, after each sc be- 
tween that and previous petal, join 9th to 1st, and sc up side to tip. 
Ch 7, sc in next tip, repeat from * around; ch 5, dc in centre of 7 
ch, ch 5, dc in sc of last round, repeat around, and sc in 1st 2 sts 
of 5 ch, ch 7, dc in centre of 5 ch, repeat around, break thread, and 
fasten securely. There will be 18 loops around daisy; after 15th 
loop on 2d daisy, join to 1st in 10th loop from fastening, ch 3, dc 
in centre of 7 ch of previous circle, ch 3, dc in centre of 5 ch, re- 
peat twice, fasten with sc in 1st st on next loop. Join all other cir- 
cles in 7th loop from previous joining except corners, which should 
have 10 loops on scallop. 

Edge for scallop : 1. Sc in 4th of 7th loop from joining, 3 dc in 
same loop. * 9 dc in each loop of scallop, 3 dc in joining loop, 3 
dc in next, repeat from *, break thread and fasten. 

2. Dc in 1st of 3 dc, * ch 2, miss 2, dc in 3d, * ch 4, miss 2, 
dc in 3d of 9, ch 4, dc in every 3d st of scallop, repeat from * to 
* twice, and begin scallop with 4 ch. 

Heading: 1. Sc in 4th of 7th loop from joining, 3 dc in same 
loop, * ch 5, dc in centre of 7 ch, repeat 6 times from *, 3 dc in loop 
at joining, 3 dc in next loop, repeat from * ; at corner, after 3 dc in 
joining loop, 3 dc in next 4 loops, 3 dc, and repeat from 1st *. 

2. Pick up 3 loops on needle in 3 dc of last row, work same as 
petal, decreasing 1 st each time across ; when but 1 st remains, ch 3, 
5 dc down side, fasten with sc in last dc of previous row, 2 dc on 1 st 



18 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



2 sts of loop, * ch 5, dc in centre of 5 ch, repeat 5 times, dc in last 
2 sts of loop and 1st of 6 dc, pick up 6 sts on needle and make tri- 
angle as before directed, working off and decreasing 1 st each time 
across, but only 1 st before 5 dc down side, fasten with sc, 2. dc on 




Daisy Lace, with Corner. 



i st 2 sts of loop, and repeat from *. At corner, after 5 ch, dc in 
last 2 sts of loop, 3 dc in dc, pick up 1 2 sts on needle, work 4 rows 
like petal, dc across, work down side, dc in next 3 sts and 2 in loop, 
ch 5, and repeat. Break thread every time across. 

3. Dc in point of triangle, long st (thread o 3 times) in centre of 5 
ch, * ch 6, dc in centre of 5 ch, ch 7, dc in centre of next, repeat 



GUIPURE LACE AND INSERTION. 19 

twice, ch 6, long st in centre of 5, repeat from * \ at corner, after 6 
ch, miss 1 st 3 sts, pick up 6, work as before 4 rows, work down side 
and over 3 sts, ch 6. 

4. Pick up sts on 6 ch and make triangle, dc in 1st 3 sts of 
loop, ch 7, dc in centre of loop, ch 7, dc in centre of next loop, 
dc on next 3 sts, miss 1, sc in 1st st of 6, pick up 5 more sts, make 
triangle, sc in ch, miss long st, dc in point, and repeat, missing long 
st. AX, corner, after dc on 1st 3 sts of loop, ch 3, miss 1, 4 rows on 
next 2 sts, sc down side, and on remaining st, ch 3, dc on 1st 3 sts 
of loop, 

5. Dc in point st, * ch 7, dc in centre of loop, ch 7, dc in next 
ch 7, dc in point, ch 3, long st between triangles, ch 3, dc in point, 
repeat from *, at corner, ch 5, dc in each of 2 sts, ch 5. 

6. Dc in point, ch 5, dc in centre of loop, ch 5, dc in dc of 
previous row, make 4 more loops of 5 ch, dc in point, ch 5, dc in 
long st, ch 5, repeat; at corner, ch 5, sc in both sts. 

7. Ch 3, dc in centre of 5, * ch 5, dc in next loop, repeat 
from *; at end, ch 3, at corner, ch 5. . 

8. Dc in 1st of 3 ch, * ch 4, dc in centre of 5, repeat from *, 
at corner, ch 2. 

9. 4 dc in each loop of 4 ch ; at corner, 2 dc in loop of 2 ch. 
This is an original lace, and considered very handsome. Portions 

of the pattern resemble drawn-work. By joining the daisies at first, 
a perfect square may be made, and the work is easy for so showy a 
pattern. One spool of the thread makes a little more than a yard 
of the lace. 

GUIPURE LACE AND INSERTION. 

[Contributed by Edith C. Ackerman, 43 Holsman Street, Paterson, N.J.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 40, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and steel hook, size 1. 

Ch 35 sts, turn. 

1. Ch 3, sh of 4 dtc, each separated by 2 ch, in 7th st, miss 3, dc 
in next st, miss 3, sh of 5 dtc, each separated by 2 ch, in next st, ch 
2, miss 3, 4 dtc in next 4, chain 2, miss 3, sh in next, miss 3, dc in 
next, ch 3, miss 3, sh in next, turn. 



20 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



2. Ch 5, sh in sh bet 2d and 3d dtc, dc in last dtc of sh, ch 3, 
sh in 2d sp of next sh, ch 2, 6 dtc on 4 dtc (2 in 1st and last, 1 in 




Guipure Lace. 

each st bet), ch 2, sh in 2d sp of next sh, catch with dc in top of 
last dtc, ch 3, sh in 2d sp of last sh, dtc in top of last dtc, turn. 

3. Ch 5, sh in 2d sp of sh, catch to last dtc, ch 3, sh in 2d sp of 
next sh, ch 2, 8 dtc on 6 dtc, ch 2, sh in sh, fasten, ch 3, sh in sh, 
turn. 

Repeat 2d and 3d rows until you have 18 dtc in the solid point. 
This will be in the 8th row. 

g. Ch 5, sh in sh, fasten, ch 3, sh in next sh, ch 2, 4 dtc on 4 
dtc, ch 2, miss 4 dtc, sh in next, miss 4, fasten in next, ch 3, sh in 
last dtc, turn. 

Continue to length desired. 

For insertion : ch 42, turn. 

1. Dtc in 5 th and 3 following sts, ch 2, miss 3, sh in next, miss 



GUIPURE LACE AND INSERTION, 



n 



4, fasten, ch 3, miss 4, sh in next, ch 2, miss 3, 18 dtc in next 18 
sts, turn. 

2. Ch 4 (taking place of 1st dtc), 15 dtc in 15 dtc, ch 2, sh in 
sh, fasten, ch 3, sh in sh, ch 2, 6 dtc on 4 dtc, turn. 

3. Ch 4, 7 dtc on 6 dtc, ch 2, sh in sh, fasten, ch 3, sh in sh, ch 
2, 14 dtc on 14, missing 2 first, turn. 

4. Ch 4, n dtc on 11 dtc, and work like 2d row, ending with 
10 dtc. 

5. Like 3d row, beginning with 4 ch and 11 dtc, ending with 
10 dtc. 

6. Like 4th row, beginning with 4 ch and 7 dtc, ending with 14 
dtc. 

7. Like 3d, beginning with 4 ch and 15 dtc, ending with 6 dtc. 

8. Like 4th, beginning with 4 ch and 3 dtc, ending with 18 dtc. 




Guipure Insertion, 



9. Ch 4, 3 dtc on 3 dtc, ch 2, miss 3, sh in next, miss 4, fasten, 
ch 3, miss 4, sh in next, ch 2, 18 dtc on sh and following sts, turn. 

Repeat from 2d row. This is a very rich and showy design for 
many purposes. If preferred, tc may be used instead of dtc. In 
finer thread the lace is very delicate. 



22 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



LACE FLOUNCE, FOR WAIST. 




[Contributed by Miss 
Mamie Hegner, 1246 Villa 
Street, Racine, Wis.] 

Materials : Bar- 
bour's Irish flax 
crochet and lace 
thread, in balls, or 
3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, ecru, No. 70, 
and steel hook, size 
o. 

Beginning on left 
side, the flounce ex- 
tends over left shoul- 
der, across back, over 
right shoulder and 
across front to open- 
ing. Three spools of 
thread are sufficient. 

Ch 50, turn. 

1. * Shell of 7 tc 
in 4th st, ch 3, miss 
3, dc in 4th st, ch 3, 
miss 3, repeat from * 
to end, turn. 

2. Ch 3, dcin 3d, 
4th, and 5 th of sh, * 
ch 7, dc in 3d, 4th, 
and 5th of next sh, 
repeat to end, turn. 

Repeat, putting sh 
in centre of 7 ch, 
and fastening ch in 
centre of 3 dc until 
you have 40 rows of 



novelty lAce, with corner. 23 

sh; then add a sh to every other row of sh, until you have 15 sh 
in a row; make 6 rows of 15 sh, then decrease in same manner 
until you have 7 sh, make 40 rows, again, then increase and de- 
crease point as before directed. 

This pattern is simple and most effective for many uses, such 
as vandyke collars, yokes, sleeves, or lace for any purpose. For 
morning dresses or dressing sacks a square yoke lined with color 
is pretty. I consider the Irish flax threads superior to any lace 
threads ever used. 



NOVELTY LACE, WITH CORNER. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Julia A. Williams, Indianola, la.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 80, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and steel hook, size 00. Nearly 1 J^ spools are required for 1 
yard. Ch as long as desired. 

1. Tc in 8th st, * ch 2, miss 2, tc in next, repeat from * to turn, 
ch 2, tc in same st as last tc, repeat, making a cluster of 3 tc with 2 
ch between in same st, then ch 2, miss 2, tc in next, and repeat. 

2. Ch 3, and a tc in every st. 

3. Ch 5, * miss 2, tc in next, ch 2, repeat to middle tc in cluster 
of 1st row, 3 tc with 2 ch between in this, then continue as before. 

4. Ch 4, 3 dtc in next 3 sts, * ch 4, miss 2, sc in top of tc, ch 4, 
miss 2, 7 dtc in next 7 sts, and repeat from *. At corner, ch 4, sc 
in 2d tc from cluster, ch 4, miss 2, 3 dtc in next 3 sts, 4 dtc in 1st 
of 3, ch 4, sc in 2d tc, ch 4, 4 dtc in 3d tc and 3 in next 3 sts, ch 
4, fasten with sc, and so continue, finishing each row with same 
number of dtc as began it, unless working on a square. 

5. Ch 4, dtc in next st, * ch 4, sc in 1st st of 4 ch of last row, 
ch 7, sc in last st of next 4 ch, ch 4, 3 dtc in 3d, 4th, and 5 th sts of 
7 dtc, leaving last loops of each on hook and working all off to- 
gether, repeat. 

6. Ch 4, dtc in next st, * ch 2, dtc in 1st st of 4 ch, ch 3, 5 
dtc in 4th st of 7 ch, leaving last loop of each on hook and work- 
ing all off at once, ch 3, dtc in last st of next 4 ch, ch 2, 3 dtc in 
top st of 3 dtc, repeat. 



24 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

7. Ch 4, 3 dtc in next 3 sts, * ch 2, dtc in dtc, ch 1, dtc in next 
dtc, ch 2, 7 dtc in next 7 sts, repeat from * to cluster of 7 dtc in 
4th row which forms turn, here make 9 dtc, and 9 on next 7 sts, 
following other directions as given. 

8. Ch 4, 3 dtc on dtc, * ch 4, sc in 1 ch, ch 4, 7 dtc on 7 dtc, 




Novelty Lace, with Corner. 

repeat from * to 9 dtc, there make * 7 dtc on 1st 2 dtc, ch 4, sc in 
5th dtc, ch 4, 7 dtc on last 2 dtc, ch 4, sc in 1 ch, ch 4, repeat from 
last *, then 7 dtc on 7 dtc, ch 4, sc in 1 ch, ch 4, and repeat to 
end. 

9. Like 5 th row. 

10. Like 6th row. 

11. Like 7th row, except that every cluster consists of 7 dtc. 

12. Ch 4, 3 dtc on 3 dtc, * ch 4, sc in 1 ch, ch 4, 7 dtc on 7 
dtc, repeat to end. 

13. Ch 4, dtc in next st, ch 5, sc in 1st st of 5 ch, ch 4, sc in 
same st, forming 2 picots, * ch 4, sc in 1st st of 4 ch, ch 4, sc in sc, 



RETICELLA WHEEL, 



2o 



ch 4, sc in last st of next 4 ch, ch 4, 3 dtc in 3d, 4th, and 5th sts of 
7 dtc, working off together, as before directed, make 3 picots as 
described, and repeat from * to end. 

To make the upper edge firm, unless the lace is worked directly 
on the material, work 3 dc over each 2 ch. 

This lace, an original pattern, resembles drawn-work, and will be 
found suitable for collars, yokes, etc., also for finishing table-covers 
and articles which require the corner. It may be made in any 
desired width, choosing a number of thread suited to the trimming 
to be made. No. 40 is a good "all around " number. 



RETICELLA WHEEL. 

[Contributed by Miss Eva M. Guernsey, 355 Euclid Avenue, Beloit, Wis.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 50, 3-cord, 200 yards 
spools, steel hook, size o. 

Ch 18, join. 

1. * 6 dc under ch, ch 14, repeat 5 times from *, making 6 
loops of ch. 

2. Sc in each of 6 dc, (3 dc in loop of 14 ch, ch 5,) 5 times, 
3 dc, sc in each of 6 dc in 
ring, and repeat from be- 
ginning all around, joining 
1st picot of 2d loop to last 
of 1 st loop, as you come 
to them. Join the wheels 
when working according to 
the use you design making 
of them. Nothing is pret- 
tier than these wheels for 
the edge of a round doily, 
previously worked in but- 
ton-hole stitch, as the pat- 
tern launders nicely, and 
there is no " picking out " to do. 

This design, which is an original one, makes very pretty passe- 
menterie. 




Reticella Wheel. 



26 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



MARTHA LACE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. H. W. Howland, Xenia, 111.] 

Materials: Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. ioo, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, knitting-needles, No. 19. 

Cast on 3 7 stitches, knit plain across. 

1. K 4, o 2, p 2 tog, (k 1, o, n, k 1, n, o,) 3 times, k 1, o, 11, k 
1, o 2, p 2 tog, k 1, o, n, o 3, n, o 2, p 2 tog. 

2. O 2, p 2 tog, k 1, make 3 sts of loop (p 1, k 1, p 1), k 2, 
p 1, o, p 2 tog, p 22, o, p 2 tog, k 4. 




Martha Lace. 



3. K 4, o 2, p 2 tog, (k i, o, n, k 1, n, o,) 3 times, k 1, o, n, 
k 1, o 2, p 2 tog, k 2, o, k 5, o 2, p 2 tog. 

4. O 2, p 2 tog, k 5, p 1, k 2, o 2, p 2 tog, p 22, o 2, p 2 tog, 

k 4 . 

5. K 4, o 2, p 2 tog, (k 1, o, n, k 1, n, o,) 3 times, k 1, o, n, 
k 1, o 2, p 2 tog, k 3, o, n, k 3, o 2, p 2 tog. 

6. O 2, p 2 tog, k 4, p 1, k 3, o 2, p 2 tog, p 22, o, p 2 tog, 

k 4 . 

7. K 4, o 2, p 2 tog, k 2, (o, k 3 tog, o, k 3,) 3 times, o, k 2, 
o 2, p 2 tog, k 4, o, n, k 2, o 2, p 2 tog. 



TATTED POINT EDGE, 



27 



8. 2, p 2 tog, k 3, p i, k 4, o 2, p 2 tog, p 23, o, p 2 tog, 

k 4 . 

9. K 4, o 2, p 2 tog, (k 1, n, o, k 1, o, n,) 3 times, k 1, n, o, 
k 2, o 2, p 2 tog, k 5, o, n, k 1, o 2, p 2 tog. 

jo. O 2, p 2 tog, k 2, p 1, k 5, o 2, p 2 tog, p 23, o, p 2 tog, 

k 4 . 

11. K 4, o 2, p 2 tog, n, (o, k 3„o, k 3 tog,) 3 times, k 3, o 2, 
p 2 tog, k 6, o, n, o 2, p 2 tog. ♦ 

12. Bind off 3, put st back on left-hand needle, then o 2, p 2 
tog, k 5, o 2, p 2 tog, p 22, o, p 2 tog, k 4. 

Repeat from 1st row. Insertion to match is made by leaving off 
scallop and making edges alike. 

This is an original pattern, and very desirable for many purposes. 
It may be knitted wider or narrower as desired. 



TATTED POINT EDGE. 

[Contributed by Miss C. Emma Goodnow, i6 "Walnut St., Marlboro', Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 80, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and ordinary shuttle. 




Tatted Point Edge. 



Made with two threads. Begin by making with 1 thread, 1st 
ring ; 3 dk, 1 p until you have 2 7 dk and 8 p, close ; turn, with 2 



28 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

threads make a scallop with 8 p and 2 7 dk, turn ; with 1 thread 
make a ring of 24 dk and 7 p, join after making 3 dk and 2 p to 3d 
p of 1 st ring, turn; make scallop of 12 dk and 3 p (using 2 threads 
again), 3 dk between each p, turn, and continue until you have 4 
rings and 3 scallops. Then make a small scallop of 3 dk, turn, 
make one ring as before, not joining, then 3 dk, turn, and work 
other side of point as the 1st, joining to middle p of opposite 
scallops ; then make another large scallop of 27 dk, 8 p, joining to 
1 st large scallop after making 3 dk, 1 p, 3 dk; turn. Now make a 
ring of 27 dk and 8 p, joining to 3d p of last ring of point, after 
making 9 dk and 2 p. This completes one point. The 2d point is 
made like 1st; join by middle of rings on 2d point to rings of 1st 
point, the 2 middle rings being joined. 

This is a very simple but desirable pattern, and makes a pretty 
finish for round linen doilies. Used for this purpose, it is better 
not to join the points, if at all, by more than 1 ring. 



DEPARTMENT 2. 



SOFA PILLOW IN ROCOCCO CROCHET. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Fitzroy Willard, Durham, Conn.] 

Materials : Five spools Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 50, 3- 
cord, 200-yards spools, 6 skeins Ulster etching flax, white, size 4, 
3 skeins Ulster white flossette, size **, a i 9-inch square of yellow 
satin, 3 yards ribbon 1 inch wide, to match, 1 y 2 yards 40-inch linen, 
common lead pencil, a round, smooth stick ^ inch in diameter, 
and steel crochet hook, size 1. 

First wheel: Wind thread 25 times around the 3^ -inch stick, 
slip off, work 50 dc around this, forming centre ring, fasten securely 
and cut thread. To form small rings, wind thread 15 times around 
pencil, slip off, make 25 dc around this, and fasten to centre ring 
with sc ; cut off, leaving 12 inches of thread. Again wind thread 
around pencil and proceed as before to 20th dc, join with sc to 1st 
small ring, 5 dc, skip 5 dc on centre ring, then fasten as before 
securely, cutting thread short. Proceed in this way, leaving every 
other small ring with long thread, until you have 9. The 10th ring 
is commenced same as the rest, 5 dc, fasten to 1st small ring, 15 dc, 
fasten to 9th small ring, 5 dc, and fasten to large ring. For the 
centre, thread coarse sewing-needle with one of ends left on small 
ring, pass it across centre ring and back, work 1 2 over and over sts 
around cross-threads, and fasten. Work other threads up in same 
way, joining all in centre of web. 

The other wheels, 49 in all, are made in same way, joining with 
sc as made. Make a web in diamond-shaped space between wheels, 
as described. When the square is complete, go around outer edge 



30 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



with chs of 3, fastened with sc to top of small rings. Cut a 19- 
inch square of linen, baste the crocheted square firmly in centre, 
buttonhole closely over the chain and through material with Ulster 
white flossette, size **, and cut away the linen under the square 




Sofa Pillow in Rococco Crochet. 



carefully, following the buttonholing. Make a finish for the edge of 
large rings, with complete wheel for each corner. Apply these to 
edge of linen square, leaving room for seam outside and fastening 
sides of rings only. Another 19-inch square of linen is required for 
back of pillow, and piece 3J4 inches deep and 76 inches long for 
ruffle. Stamp pretty scallop on edge, buttonhole with etching flax, 



DOILY. 31 

cut out carefully, gather and stitch to outside of cover on 4 sides. 
Fasten back of cover to this on 3 sides, slip in the pillow, which is 
covered on one side with any desired shade of silk or satin, and hem 
down remaining side of cover, so that it may be easily removed for 
laundering. Draw in ribbons to match centre between rings and 
foundation, leaving ends long enough to come to edge of ruffle. 

Although quite tedious in telling, this work is very simple, and is, 
as will be readily perceived, applicable to a great variety of uses. A 
bedspread, with shams to match, would be especially handsome, 
the lining to be removed before laundering. The work is durable, 
and, as it requires little thought, may be picked up as occasion offers, 
and so done without great effort. If making large articles, strips of 
squares may be first made, then joined. 



DOILY. 

[Contributed by A. Olivia Wertman, Tannersville, Pa.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax crochet and lace thread, in balls, 
or 3-cord, 200-yards spools, No. 40, white, steel hook, size 1, maltese 
pin, 1 inch across, and a circle of butcher's linen 5 inches in 
diameter. 

This is a simple pattern, but care must be taken to make it ac- 
cording to directions. Do not try to make it with other thread than 
that named. 

First, cut the circle, 5 inches in diameter, then fold it over 3 
times, and cut a triangle out of the curved edge. Straighten out, 
lay a ten-cent piece under each point and mark circles. Cut out 
and buttonhole these with long and short stitch, working around the 
edge of star in same manner. 

To make the maltese lace, make a loop in the thread, put on a 
prong of the pin, holding the prongs down so that the work will 
run off easily, turn the pin and make 2 dc on the thread, and a loop 
around the prong; * turn, miss 1st dc, 1 dc in 2d dc, also 1 dc 
under top thread of last loop ; make a loop around prong, and 
repeat from * until there are 432 loops on one side of lace. At 
every 54 loops mark with a pin, for a scallop. Join neatly at the 



32 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

ends, then, without breaking thread, ch to top of ist loop, * join to 
a point of linen centre, and fill in the inside of scallop as follows : 
(Ch 5,sc on i loop) 3 times, (ch 5, sc on 2 loops taken together) 
6 times, (sc through 2 loops together) 12 times, ch 2, sc in centre 




Doily. 

of 5 ch, ch 2, sc in 2 loops together, ch 2, sc in centre of next 5 ch, 
ch 2, sc in 2 loops together, ch 2, sc in centre of next 5 ch, ch 2, 
sc in 2 loops together, (ch 5, sc in 2 loops together) twice, (ch 5, 
sc on 1 loop) 4 times, repeat from * 7 times more. If no mistakes 
are made in counting it must come out even. Break thread and 
fasten on centre of scallop, and work on outside as follows : * (Ch 



ROSE AND LEAF DOILY. 33 

3, scon i loop) 13 times, (ch i, sc on 2 loops together) 13 times, 
(ch 3, sc on 1 loop) 14 times; this fills 1 scallop. Repeat 7 times 
more. Now, work 8 roll-stitch daisies. Ch 6, join; ch 6, 18 roll 
sts in ring, join. The roll st is made as follows : Thread over 
needle 20 times (or as often as called for), needle in work, thread 
over, draw through the work, thread over, draw through coil on 
needle, thread over, draw through 1 loop on needle. The roll, 
when done, has a string the length of roll on left side. The length 
of st is regulated by the number of overs. To make this st a needle 
that slants to a point must be used. To facilitate the passage of the 
needle, keep the overs in their place with thumb and middle finger 
of left hand. A little practice will enable one to make this st 
readily, and it is used in many charming combinations. 

* To join the daisies, begin again on centre of scallop, ch 4, sc in 
each 13 sps formed by 3 ch of previous row, ch 5, join to daisy, ch 
5, miss 3 loops, ch 5, miss 1 roll st, and so on until 8 roll sts are 
joined; then ch 4, sc in each of 13 sps, repeat from * 7 times 
more. The last row is simply 5 ch and sc in each sp on scallops 
and between each roll st on daisies. 

Now, make 8 tiny daisies of 3 ch and 10 roll sts of 7 overs each 
in the ring, join. Take stiff paper, baste the doily evenly and tight 
on it, and sew the small daisies in the circles with flannel- stitch. 
Fill the other spaces with wheels in basket stitch, the method of 
working which is plainly shown. Take from paper and work same 
in centre of star. Dampen with a cloth and press on wrong side, 
and if worked as directed you have " a thing of beauty" which the 
Irish flax thread makes a " joy forever." The uses of the maltese 
work in articles of this kind are without number. 



ROSE AND LEAF DOILY. 

[Contributed by Miss Ida Plumer, Centre Street, West Roxbury, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax crochet and lace thread, No. 70, 
white, in balls, or 3 -cord, 200-yards spools, and steel hook, size 
o. It takes a little more than 1 spool for the doily. 



34 barbour's prize needle-work series, 

Ch 1 2, join. 

i. Ch 7, i tc in ring, ch 5, i tc, repeat 3 times, ch 5, and join in 
3d st of 7 ch. 

2. Make 1 dc, 1 tc, 5 dtc, 1 tc, 1 dc under each 5 ch, making 
6 shells. 

3. Ch 6, 1 sc between 2 dc between next 2 shells ; repeat around, 
keeping ch at back of work. 

4. Under 6 ch work 1 dc, 1 tc, 7 dtc, 1 tc, 1 dc ; repeat around. 

5. Like 3d row, with 7 ch instead of 6. 

6. Under 7 ch work 1 dc, 1 tc, 9 dtc, 1 tc, 1 dc ; repeat. 

7. Same as 3d, with 9 ch. 




Rose and Leaf Doily. 



8. Under 9 ch work 12 dc; repeat. 

9. Ch 5, miss 1 st dc, sc in next; repeat. 

10. Ch 5, 1 sc in middle of 5 ch of preceding row; repeat. 



TUMBLER DOILY. 35 

ii. Like ioth row. 

12. Ch 7, i sc in middle of 5 ch ; repeat around. 

13. Ch 7, 1 sc in middle of 7 ch; repeat around. 

14. Ch 9, 1 sc in middle of 7 ch ; repeat around. 

15. Ch 9, 1 sc in middle of 9 ch • repeat around, and fasten off. 
The outer row of roses we work separately like the centre rose as 

far as 8th row, joining 4th petal to the rose preceding, and 5 th and 
6th petals to 2 loops of doily. For the leaves, ch 14, turn, miss 2, 
1 dc in each of 11 following, 3 dc in last st, 10 dc down other side 
of ch, ch 1, turn, miss 1 ch and 1 dc, 10 dc in 10 following, 3 dc in 
centre of 3 widening dc, 11 in next 11 sts down other side, ch 1, 
turn, miss 1 ch and 1 dc, 1 1 dc in next 1 1 sts, 3 in centre of 3 
widening dc, 10 dc in 10 dc down other side, ch i,turn. Continue 
in this way, alternating 10 and 11 dc, until there are 7 ridges. 
Always work in back loop of st. It will require 1 1 leaves. After 
all are made, fasten between each rose with needle and thread. 
The idea for this doily is original, and made with Barbour's Irish 
flax thread, No. 40 or No. 50, it gives a beautiful centre-piece for the 
table. Crocheted of Ulster rope linen floss, using shade 112 for the 
roses, shade 20 for the leaves, and shade 134 for the centre, a 
lovely lamp or vase mat is made. Colors of floss may, of course, 
be chosen, as desired. 



TUMBLER DOILY. 

[Contributed by Estella Ball, Talmage, Kan.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 90, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, a fine steel hook, and a piece of damask or other fine linen. 
Mark a circle with something perfectly round, 6 inches in diameter, 
and buttonhole-stitch the edge rather closely before cutting out. (If 
preferred, the circle may be cut, a narrow hem turned down, one 
turn being sufficient, then dc around, putting the sts as near together 
as possible without having 2 in same place, then make a dc in each 
dc of last row.) 

I. 1 tc in each buttonhole st. 



36 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



2. 9 dc in 9 tc, ch 4, miss 1, dtc in next, leaving top loop on 
hook, miss 1, dtc in next, as before, miss 1, dtc in next, draw thread 
through 4 sts at once, ch 5, turn, catch in top of 4 ch, turn, 1 
dc, 15 tc, 1 dc, all under 5 ch, ch 4, miss 1 ; repeat around, taking 
care that it is coming out right, as it will do if a little thought is 
given to it. 




Tumbler Doily. 



3. Miss i st of 9 dc, 1 dc in each of next 7, ch 3, 1 dc in 1st tc 
in shell, * ch 6, 1 dc in 5 th st of ch, 1 tc in each of next 4 sts of 
ch, fasten with 1 dc in 4th tc of shell, and repeat from * 4 times. 
(When making remaining scallops, fasten 1st point to last point of 
preceding scallop with one dc.) Fasten and break off thread. 

4. Fasten in thread where points are joined, ch 5, 2 dc in top 
of point, ch 5, 2 dc in top of next point, and repeat around. 



HEXAGON TABLE-MATS. 37 

5. Tc in 3d st of 5 ch, * ch 5, fasten in 4th st to form picot, 
miss 1, 1 tc in next, and repeat around. 

These doilies may be made on this general plan of any size de- 
sired, the lace being as much wider as preferred. It is very easy to 
originate pretty patterns in working around. One very simple and 
desirable style is made by working 2 tc in a place with ch between, 
the next row of tc being worked under the ch of 1st row. By mak- 
ing the separating ch longer as required, and finishing the outer row 
with a row of dc or "buttonhole" st, and picots, a durable and 
pretty border is made. In fact, there is no limit to the combina- 
tions that may be had. Having once used the Irish flax thread for 
these useful and pretty additions to the table, no one will use any- 
thing else. The doilies are improved by embroidering a small de- 
sign in the centre of each, using flossette **, or the Ulster floss in 
colors, if preferred. 



HEXAGON TABLE-MATS. 

[Contributed by Julia D. Smith, Box 159, West Medway, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax crochet and lace-thread, in balls, 
No. 18, steel hook, size 3. No. 25, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, is 
quite as desirable if a finer rib is wanted. In this case it will be 
only necessary to work around a greater number of times. Use 
white and ecru. 

1. Ch 2, 12 dc in 1st st, join with sc to 1st dc, turn. 

2. 2 dc in ist st, 1 dc in next, repeat around, starting the 6 
corners, turn. 

3. Dc all around, with 2 dc in the ist of 2 widening dc in last 
row, turn. 

Repeat 3d row until you have 4 ridges ; this is with the white. 
Then work once around with the ecru in the same way. In next 3 
rows, which complete the ecru rib, and form the last white rib, put 
3 dc in ist of widening dc at corners. Fasten off, and cut thread. 

For the round mat, make 7 of these hexagons. Either sew or 
crochet them together, 1 in centre, 6 around it. For the border : 



38 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



1. Tc in a st, * ch i, miss i, i tc in next, repeat from* all 
around, putting 3 tc with 1 ch between in middle widening st at 
corners; put 1 tc between hexagons, join 1st tc to last by sc. 

2. Tc in tc between hexagons, ch 3, miss 2 tc, dc under 1 ch, 




Hexagon Table-Mats. 



ch 5, miss 2 tc, 1 dc in next tc, ch 3, miss 1 tc, tc under 1 ch, 
ch 3, miss 1 tc, dc in 1st of 3 tc at corner, ch 5, dc in last of 3, 
ch 3, miss 1 tc, tc under 1 ch, ch 3, miss 1 tc, dc in next, ch 5, 
miss 1 tc, dc in next, ch 3, miss 1 tc, tc under 1 ch, ch 3, miss 1 tc, 
dc in 1st of 3, ch 5, dc in last, and continue around mat. 

3. * Dc on tc between hexagons, ch 1, sh of 7 dtc, each separated 
by 1 ch, ch 1, and repeat from * 



BUFFET SCARF, IN IDEAL HONITON CROCHET. 39 

4. Dc under i ch before sh, * ch 3, dc under next 1 ch, repeat 
around sh, then repeat from beginning, having no ch between dc 
before and after sh. These last 2 ch rows are of ecru. 

5. Like 4th row, fastening under chs of preceding row, no ch 
between dc before and after scallops. 

As many mats may be made as wanted, and in any shape. Three 
hexagons, set lengthwise, make a pretty mat ; another may have 1 o 
hexagons, 2 in centre and 8 around them ; another, 3 set around, 
another 4 ; in short, the shape of mats may be varied almost as de- 
sired. The combination of white and the rich ecru of Barbour's Irish 
flax threads is very -striking. I wish to echo a suggestion that has 
been make by others : the flax thread should be used for these 
table accessories in all cases if one expects good results, just as one 
prefers linen to cotton napkins and table-cloth. 



BUFFET SCARF, IN IDEAL HONITON CROCHET. 

[Contributed by Mrs. A. L. Wertman, Tannersville, Pa.] 

Materials : Five spools Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 40, 3-cord, 
200-yards spools, 2 skeins Ulster white flossette, size *, 2 l / 2 yards 
fine linen, and crochet needle, No. 1. 

The thread is worked up into medallions, as follows: Ch 12, turn, 
miss 2 sts, 5 stc in next 5 sts ; this makes 1st leaf. Now ch to, 
miss 2, 6 stc in next 6 sts, forming 2d leaf. Ch 11, miss 2, 7 stc 
in next 7 sts, making 3d leaf. Ch 10, miss 2, 6 stc in next 6 sts — 
4th leaf. Ch 9, miss 2, 5 stc in next 5 sts — 5th leaf. * Ch 7, 
miss 2, 5 stc in next 5 sts, forming 6th or centre leaf; repeat from* 
once, making 7th leaf, and work 3 stc between 5 th and 4th leaves. 
Ch 8, miss 2, 6 stc in next 6 sts, 3 stc between 4th and 3d leaves, 
finishing 8th leaf. Ch 9, miss 2, 7 stc in next 7 sts, 3 stc between 
3d and 2d leaves, finishing 9th leaf. Ch 8, miss 2, 6 stc in next 6 
sts, 3 stc between 2d and 1st leaves, finishing 10th leaf. Ch 7, 
miss 2, 5 stc in next 5 sts, finishing nth leaf. Then 4 stc and 1 
dc on next 5 sts at end finishes 12 th leaf. Work 10 ch sts from leaf 
to leaf on each side of centre leaves, fastening with sc, and 5 chs on 



40 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NKEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



sides of medallion. Under each 10 ch work n tc, and under 5 ch, 
6 tc. 

This completes one medallion. The scarf shown contains 142 of 
them. These are first basted firmly in place on the linen, and each 
stitched around with the sewing-machine, having the stitch rather 




Buffet Scarf, in Ideal Honiton Crochet. 



short. In this design the outside edge of the scarf is cut out, and 
tiny scallops crocheted around the medallions. The inside edges 
are all worked in reversed buttonhole-stitches, long and short. 
Where the medallions join so as to inclose a space, this should be 
worked with sorrento wheels as used in drawn-work. On the sides 
oS the scarf,- after the 4 medallions pointing inward, they are set 
straight to where the 4 begin on the other end, which is finished 
simply with 3 medallions in each corner, pointing in, and 2 between 
these, as on the side. Any ideal honiton design may be adapted to 
this work. The medallions are desirable for finishing centre-pieces, 



SIDEBOARD SCARF. 41 

table-covers, etc., especially the latter if worked in the Ulster floss in 
colors and applied to fancy denim or other suitable material. In 
this article I have merely made a suggestion, which may be elabo- 
rated to almost any extent. A pair of small, sharp scissors should be 
used to cut away the linen beneath the medallions, and care should 
be taken not to cut too close to the stitching. 



SIDEBOARD SCARF, WITH GUIPURE LACE AND 

INSERTION. 

[Contributed by Miss Alice S. Luka, Van Deusen, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 60, in balls, or 3-cord, 
200-yards spools, steel hook, No. o, and iy£ yards butcher's linen, 
or according to length of scarf required. 

Work insertion and lace alike with exception of lower half-circle 
of wheels ; each wheel is connected to the other in working the 
picot round, forming a circle to be filled in alternately with a differ- 
ent pattern. Begin as follows : 

1. Ch 11, join ■ ch 3, tc in ring, ch 5 for picot, dc in tc, 2 tc in 
ring, * ch 5, dc in top of tc, 2 tc in ring, repeat from * 9 times, 
fastening to top of 3 ch after last picot with sc ; cut thread and 
fasten securely. 

2. Ch 11, join; ch 3, tc in ring, 1 picot as before, 2 tc in ring, 
ch 2, sc in picot of 1st wheel, ch 2, dc in tc, 2 tc in ring, ch 2, 
catch in next picot of 1st wheel, ch 2, dc in tc, 2 tc in ring, * 5 ch, 
dc in tc, 2 tc in ring, repeat until there are 1 1 picots in round, 
after last dc, sc in top of 3 ch, fasten off. 

Continue in this way, joining the wheels so that 2 picots are on 
the inside of each and 5 on the lower or outer side. The wheels 
are all made in the same way, and joined circle to circle, as shown. 
It will be seen that, although apparently intricate, the design is 
easily worked. The addition of single wheels at top and bottom 
completes the half-circle, joined so as to leave 1 picot of each of 4 
wheels unoccupied. 

To fill in the open spaces : 



42 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



i. Ch 1 1, join ; dc in ring, * ch 8, sc in picot of wheel, ch 8, dc 
in ring, ch 8, sc in next picot of same wheel, ch 8, dc in ring, repeat 
7 times, fasten with sc in dc, cut thread. 

2. Next space : Fasten thread in picot of wheel, ch 8, dtc in 
next picot, keep last 2 sts on hook, dtc in picot of next wheel, work 
last 2 sts off with remaining 2 on hook, ch 3, and repeat from *. 




Sideboard Scarf, with Guipure Lace and Insertion. 



At end of round sc in 5 th and 6th sts of 8 ch. Next round, ch 4, 
tc in 2d st of 3 ch, thread over hook, * tc in 2d st of next ch, thread 
over, repeat from *, at end of round put thread over hook and draw 
through all sts on hook, cut thread. The half-circles are filled with half 
the 1st pattern, and the edge has a tc in every 2d st and every picot, 
each being separated by 2 ch. 

Make the lace in same manner, leaving off half-circle of wheels 



SERVETTE, WITH CROCHET APPLIQUE, 



43 



on lower edge, and joining a single wheel between 2 wheels of circle 
by connecting to 2 picots of both wheels. 

The linen is simply hemstitched, 1 inch on sides and on both 
edges of insertion, and 2 inches deep on ends, below which the lace 
is sewed on. 



SERVETTE, WITH CROCHET APPLIQUE. 

[Contributed by Miss E. Kate Tompkins, Floyd, Va.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 90, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, fine steel crochet hook, and 14-inch square of linen. 




Servette, with Crochet Applique. 



Turn hem of 2 inches, leaving the square 12 inches. For the 
wheels, wind thread 25 times around a small pencil, or stick size of 
slate-pencil, slip off, and catch with sc. 



44 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

i. Ch 3, 28 dtc in ring, fasten with sc in top of 3 ch. 

2. Ch 5, miss 1 dtc, tc in next, * ch 3, miss i,tc in next, repeat, 
and fasten in 3d of 5 ch, making 14 sps around wheel. 

Make 34 wheels, either catching together with si st as made, or 
sewing when completed. Baste these on edge of hem, taking care 
that they are straight and smooth, and buttonhole the edges of 
wheels closely to the linen. When the work is completed, cut 
away the cloth beneath. 

This design is, of course, very simple, but capable of almost un- 
limited variation. Any crochet pattern, wheels, rosettes, medallions, 
etc., may be applied in the same way. Wheels may be applied 
around the edge of doilies, buttonholing half on. A centre-piece of 
large crochet medallions combined with colored embroidery is very 
striking. Pieces of work may be square, oval, or round, any shape 
desired. As a finish for sideboard-scarf, table-cover, shelf-covers, 
etc., no method of decoration is nicer than this, it being rapidly 
done and most effective. There seems little need for urging the use 
of Barbour's Irish flax thread in this work, as no lady who has 
used it will again resort to cotton or inferior threads. 



V-SHAPED YOKE. 

[Contributed by Miss Henrietta Rossiter, 128 Sanford Street, Muskegon, Mich.] 

Materials : 2 spools Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 60, 3-cord, 
200-yards spools, size o crochet hook, and 1 yard baby-ribbon. 

The yoke is of new style, very pretty for corset-covers, night- 
dresses, or dressing-sacks. It is formed of small wheels, joined as 
they are made. To make the wheel, ch. 4, join. 

1. Ch 8, 1 dtc in ring, * ch 4, 1 dtc in ring, repeat from * 3 
times, ch 4, fasten with sc in 4th stitch of 8 ch. 

2. Ch 3, 1 tc in 4th st of 8 ch, * 1 tc in each of next four sts, 2 
tc in next st, repeat from * 4 times, 1 tc in next 4 sts, fasten with 
sc in top of 3 ch. 

3. * Ch 5, 1 dc in 3d st, repeat from * n times. 

To join the wheels, join 3d st of each of 2 loops of wheel to cor- 



V-SHAPED YOKE. 



45 



responding loops of previous wheel, with sc. Make the ist row at 
back of yoke 10 wheels in width, 2d row of 11 wheels, and 3d of 12 
wheels. Make front of yoke 4 wheels in width, graduating from 5 
to 8 wheels in length. The edge around outside, make as follows : 

1. A tc in 3d st of 4th loop of ist wheel on bottom row, * ch 4, 
1 dc in 3d st of next loop, ch 4, dc in next loop, ch 4, tc in next 
loop, ch 5, tc in ist loop on next wheel, repeat from * twice, ch 4, 




V-shaped Yoke. 



dc in next loop, ch 4, dc in next, ch 5, tc in next loop, ch 5, dc in 
next loop, ch 4, tc in next loop, ch 5, tc in ist loop on next wheel, 
repeat from ist to 2d * 6 times, ch 4, dc in next loop, ch 5, tc in 
next loop, ch 5, dc in next, ch 4, dc in next, ch 4, tc in next, ch 5, 
tc in ist loop on next wheel, repeat from ist to 2d * 8 times, 
work around corner wheel same as ist corner, repeat from ist to 2d * 
3 times. 

2. Tc in each st of previous row, at corners 3 tc in top of tc. 

Run ribbon through inside row of wheels. Cuffs to match are 



46 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

made of 4 wheels in depth, top row 10 wheels round, next row 9 
wheels, next 8, and next 7 wheels. Make edge around top same as 
on yoke, and run ribboii through bottom row, fastening with a bow. 
This design is very pretty and useful for any style of collars or 
yokes, being easily fashioned to the pattern, which may be cut from 
paper. 

NIGHT-DRESS YOKE. 

[Contributed by Miss S. Davidson, 231 6th Street, San Francisco, Cal.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax crochet and lace thread, in balls, 
or 3-cord, 200-yards spools, No. 60, and steel hook, size o. Three 
spools are required for the yoke. 

Wheels are begun in centre ; ch 5, join. 

1. Ch 3, 1 tc in ring, * ch 1, 1 tc in ring, repeat from * 5 times, 
ch 1, fasten to 2d of 3 ch ; there should be 8 sps. 

2. 1 dc in first sp, ch 3, 1 dc in same sp, forming a picot, then 
1 dc, ch 3, 1 dc in next sp, and repeat. 

3. Ch 8, 1 tc between 1st and 2d picot, ch 5, tc between 2d and 
3d picot, continue until you have 7 sps, ch 5, fasten in 3d of 8 ch. 

4. Fill each of 8 sps with 8 dc, and fasten at end. This com- 
pletes a wheel. 

To form yoke, join 9 wheels in 1st row; in last row of wheel, fill 
6 sps with dc, 4 dc in 7th, join with sc to preceding wheel, 4 dc in 
same sp ; repeat same in next sp. Join all the row in same way. 
The 2d row has also 9 wheels, and begins to join at the bottom. 
Miss 5 sps of lower wheel of 1st row, fasten in centre of 6th, then 
join next sp to 1st sp of 2d wheel in 1st row, next to 1st sp of 7th 
wheel, and finish the row in same way, joining succeeding wheels of 
2d row as already directed. The 3d row has nine wheels, also, and. 
the 1 st is joined to 9th of preceding row by missing 3 sps, proceed- 
ing as before directed. Three sps are left at the bottom of each 
row except 1st, which has 5 for corner. The 4th row has 12 wheels, 
beginning to form shoulder; 5th row, n wheels; 6th row, 10 
wheels ; 7th row, 9 wheels ; and 8th row, 8 wheels. This completes 
Yz the yoke ; work the other side in same way. 



NIGHT-DRESS YOKE, 



47 



Finish around the yoke : 4 tc with 2 ch between on top of wheels, 
ch 2 ; 1 dtc between last 2 sps of wheel, keeping top loop on hook, 
1 dtc between 1st 2 sps of next wheel, keep last st on hook and 




Night-Dress Yoke. 



draw through all together, ch 3, and repeat around the yoke, putting 
11 tc at corners, with 2 ch between. Fill each sp with 3 dc. 

To make collar and front, join 30 wheels, 20 for collar and 10 for 
front; join 20th wheel to 1st of 10 wheels, by catching on 1st and 
2d sps, leaving 4 for corner. As it is to be sewed on right side of 
yoke, this should join toward the right. 



48 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

Edge: 

i. Dc between ist and 2d wheel, ch 5, fasten with dc in centre 
of 1 st sp, ch 5, 1 dc in next sp, ch 5, 1 dc between the 2 wheels; 
continue all around. 

2. Tc on dc between wheels, ch 2, dc in centre of 5 ch, ch 5, 
dc in centre of next 5 ch, ch 5, dc in centre of next 5 ch, ch 2, tc 
on dc between wheels, ch 2, dc in centre of 5 ch ; repeating around. 

3. Tc on tc, between wheels, ch 1, 5 dtc under 5 ch, 1 dtc on 
dc, 5 dtc under next 5 ch, ch 1, tc on tc between wheels, and repeat. 



ANTIQUE SQUARE FOR BED-SPREAD. 

[Contributed by Emma C. Monroe, Roxbury, Mass.] 

Materials ; Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 40, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and steel hook, size 1. 
Ch 105. 

1. Dc in' 7th st, ch 3, miss 2, tc in next, (ch 3, miss 2, dc in 
next, ch 3, miss 2, tc in next) twice, 12 tc in next 12 sts, 6 sps {as 
enclosed in parentheses), 12 tc in next 12 sts, 3 sps, turn. 

2. Ch 8, tc on tc (ch 5, tc on nexttc), ch 5, 13 tc on 13 tc, 6 
sps (as in parentheses), tc in each of 12 tc following, 3 sps, turn. 

3. Ch 6, dc in centre of 5 ch, ch 3, tc in tc, ch 3, dc in centre 
of 5 ch, ch 3, tc in tc, * 5 tc over 5 ch, and 1 in ist of 13 tc, (ch 1, 
miss 1, tc in next) 6 times, 6 tc in next 6 sts, 4 sps, and repeat 
from *, ending with 2 instead of 4 sps. 

4. Like 3d row, save that sps are of 5 ch separated by tc. It 
will be readily seen that the odd row sps are of chs caught down, 
those of even rows plain. Odd rows are begun with 6 ch, even 
rows with 8. 

5. i sp, 7 tc, 11 tc separated by 1 ch, 7 tc, 2 sps, 7 tc, 11 tc as 
before, 7 tc, 1 sp. 

6. Like 5th, sps over sps, tc over tc. 

7. Ch 3, 5 tc in 5 ch and in ist of 7 tc * (ch 1, miss 1, tc in 
next) 7 times, ch 5, miss 1 tc, tc in next tc, ch 5, miss 1 tc, tc in 



ANTIQUE SQUARE FOR BED-SPREAD, 



49 



next tc, (ch i, miss i ch, tc in next tc) 7 times, 12 tc in next 12 
sts, repeat from *, ending with 7 tc. 

8. Chain 3, tc on 6 tc, * 6 tc separated by 1 ch ch 4, miss 1 tc, 




Antique Square for Bed-Spread. 

1 sc over centre tc of last row, ch 4, miss 1st tc, 6 tc separated by 
1 ch, 13 tc on 13 tc, repeat from *, ending with 7 tc. 

9. Ch 3, 6 tc on tc, * ch 1,1 tc, making 6 tc in all, each 
separated by 1 ch, ch 5, 2 tc in centre tc with 1 dc on each side, 
ch 5, 6 tc separated by 1 ch on 6 tc, ch 1, 13 tc on 13 tc, repeat 
from *, ending with 7 tc. 



50 harbour's prize needle-work series. 

io. Ch 3, tc on tc, * 7 tc each separated by 1 ch, putting last 
in 2d st of 5 ch, ch 3, tc in centre of tc, ch 3, 7 tc, each separated 
by 1 ch, putting 1st in 4th st of 5 ch, 13 tc on tc, repeat from *, 
ending with 7 tc. 

11. 1 sp, 7 tc, 11 tc separated by 1 ch, 7 tc, 5 tc separated by 
1 ch (always with 1 ch before and after), 7 tc, 11 tc separated by 
1 ch, 7 tc, sp. 

12. Like nth row, with open sps. 

13. 2 sps, 7 tc, 5 tc separated by 1 ch, 7 tc, n tc separated by 
1 ch, 7 tc, 5 tc separated by 1 ch, 7 tc, 2 sps. 

14. Like 13th, with open sps, as previously explained. 

x 5- 3 S P S > x 3 tc > 7 tc separated by 1 ch, ch 5, miss a tc, 1 tc in 
next, ch 5, miss a tc, 7 tc separated by 1 ch, 13 tc, 3 sps. 

The centre spider is now begun again, and there is no necessity 
for continuing directions further. The square shown consists of 5 
blocks. If desired, it may consist of 9, worked in the same way. 
When a block or strip of blocks, however large, is completed, leaves 
are worked over the plain, solid blocks (4 rows of 13 tc) as follows : 
Fasten in centre, ch 6, catch in corner with sc, ch 2, 5 tc and 1 stc 
in 6 ch sts, repeat to form 4 leaves, join first to last with sc. 

This is a very handsome design, and easily worked, requiring 
little or no thought to follow. Finer or coarser thread may be 
chosen, as liked. No. 40 is a very desirable size. 



SPONGE BASKET. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Dorothea Hutchinson, Berea, Ky.] 

Materials : Ulster rope linen floss, size 00, 14 skeins shade 41 
and 4 skeins shade 100, with steel hook, No. 4. 

I. To make the net- work, begin with shade 41, ch 4, join ; ch 5, 
dc in 1st st of ch, ch 5, catch in 2d st of ch, and so on until 4 chs 
are made. Then ch 5, catch in middle of 5 ch of last round, ch 5, 
catch in same st to widen, ch 5, catch in middle of next ch, ch 5, 
catch in same st to widen, repeat around ; in next round, make chs. 



SPONGE BASKET 



51 



of 5 sts and catch in middle of chs of preceding round, widening as 
before in every widening of 2d round. Work in this manner, being 
careful to widen only in the 4 widenings of preceding round, until 
15 rounds are made. Then work around without widening a few 
times, according to depth desired for basket. 




Sponge Basket. 



The border may be worked upon the netting or by itself and 
joined to the front of the basket. Work upon a chain or foundation 
of 143 sts, putting 1 tc in every st : turn. 

2. Ch 5, miss 1, dc in next, ch 5, miss 1, dc in next, ch 8, miss 
1 , 1 dc in next, turn ; 8 tc under ch, ch 3, to form point of scallop, 
6 tc under ch, dc in ch of 5 sts, turn ; ch 4, 1 tc in every st, 2 tc 
under 3 ch at point, ch 3, 2 tc in same place, 1 tc in every st on 



52 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

other side, miss i tc of foundation, dc in next tc, turn ; ch 4, miss 
1 tc in point, tc in next, * ch 1, miss 1, tc in next, repeat around, 
putting 3 tc in point, with 1 ch between, 1 dc in 5 ch, turn; ch 4, 
1 tc with 1 ch between under each 1 ch of preceding row, miss 1 tc 
of foundation, dc in next. This completes a scallop ; repeat until 
14 are formed, or according to size of basket. Work 1 dc in every 
st, using shade 100, joining the scallops without working in depth 
between each. Make a tassel of the 2 shades for each point, and 
suspend by a cord of chain-stitch attached to ends and centre of 
front, and fastened to a ring covered with dc. The frame may be 
either of bamboo or wire ; I prefer the former. The piece for the 
back should be about 9 inches, and that for the front 14 inches long. 
Join two ends by piercing each with a heated knitting-needle or 
similar implement and sewing with strong thread, then run them 
through the chs, join other ends in same way, and cover with a 
looped bow of narrow ribbon matching shade 100 in color, or with 
a tassel. Finish by a tassel at point where netting was begun. 

This is a useful little article and may be made very dainty. 
Yellow and white are pretty colors to combine. The fluted border 
may be applied to many uses. For a " catch-all " to hang beside 
the dressing-table it may be lined with silk to match the color of 
floss used. 



ECCLESIASTICAL GIRDLE. 

Materials : Barbour's 9-cord flax thread, pure white, and steel 
hook, size 3. 

Ch 1 1 , close in ring. 

Holding the ring between 1st finger and thumb, without twisting, 
work around in each back st of ch. Then simply crochet around 
and around, working from inside of ring. The stitch in which the 
hook should be inserted each time is the left half of st of previous 
round, which lies on outside of work, between the spiral rows ; that 
is, having a st on needle, you insert hook in next st of work ; the 
thread you now draw through forms the st in which hook is to be 
inserted next round. It is very simple, when once understood. 



ECCLESIASTICAL GIRDLE. 



53 



The girdle shown is 2^ yards long. Any tassels preferred 
may be used as a finish. Those 
shown have a bell-shaped cap, 
worked in the same manner 
as the girdle. Begin with a 
loop of 5 ch, and increase by 
making 2 sts in 1 every 2d 
round. Increase 3 sts in 1st 
round. The model is 5 inches 
deep, ij^ inches around the 
last round, but may be made 
smaller if desired. The fringe 
is made as long as wanted, 
brought up under the cap and 
sewed firmly to secure it, up 
through the opening to girdle, 
and around same to fix it firmly 
in place, back again, and through 
the cap, where it is tied. Take 
a 2 -inch piece of cloth, wind 
well with the flax thread, in- 
sert up through fringe and cap 
and end of girdle, fasten with 
a few stitches, then through 
opening again; wind around 
threads between cap and gir- 
dle about 5 times, which keeps 
it in place, now back through 
cap and fasten. This piece of 
wound cloth will keep the 
tassel in place. 

These girdles are very rich 
and heavy, the lustre of the flax 

making the work particularly attractive. The girdle may be made 
smaller by beginning with a less number of ch. 




Ecclesiastical Girdle. 



54 



barbour's prize needle-work series, 



BELT IN AFGHAN STITCH. 

[Contributed by Emma C. Munroe, Roxbury, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 30, black, 3-cord, 
200-yards spools, and steel hook, size 1. 
Make a ch of 25 sts, turn. 

1. Miss 1 st st, then take up every following st and draw thread 
through, keeping all on hook. 

2. Take up thread and draw through 2 sts, then again, and draw 
through 2 sts, repeating until all are worked off. 




Belt in Afghan Stitch. 



3. Take up the sts again, putting hook under each of the little 
upright loops, being sure not to miss the one at the end. 

Continue in this way, taking up and working off, until the belt is 
of length desired. Add any buckle and slide that is liked. 

The belt may be made as wide as desired by making the foundav 
tion chain longer or shorter. Line if wished, and use ecru, gray, or 
white flax thread, if preferred. The stitch will be found a most 
useful one in this way; and the belts have all the appearance of silk, 
while very durable. 

The afghan stitch is useful in many other ways. Will mention a 
necktie made with same number of thread, ecru. Begin with ch of 
30 sts, and work, as directed, a strip of 14 inches. Then narrow, by 
drawing through an extra st at one end, and missing 1st upright loop 
at other, every other row, to 12 sts, continue 14 inches, increase by 
making 2 sts in 1 loop on each side, every other row, to 20 sts, work 



KNITTED CORNER FOR HANDKERCHIEF. 55 

7 inches, finish the ends with row of tiny scallops, and with size 4 
Ulster etching-flax, any color desired, work little cross-stitch 
diamonds, squares, or what you like. Line with silk to match floss 
in color, if desired. 

Cross-stitch patterns may be readily transferred to articles worked 
in this stitch. 



KNITTED CORNER FOR HANDKERCHIEF. 

[Contributed by Mrs. D. F. Parsons, Lynnfleld Centre, Mass.] 

Materials : 1 spool Barbour's Irish flax thread, white, 3-cord, 200- 
yards spools, and 2 knitting-needles, No. 22. 
Cast on 45 sts ; do not knit across plain. 

1. K 3, o, n, k 2, n, * o, n, o, n, o, k 2, n, k 4, n, k 2, o, k 1, o, 
n, o, n, o, n, k 3, o, n, ** k 5, n, o, k 2, o 2, p 1. 

2. (O 2, p 2 tog), o (when the directions say "o," and the 
thread is before the needle already, simply let it remain so), k 10, 
o, n, p 27, k 5. 

3. K 3, o, n, k 3, o, n, o, n, * o, k 2, n, k 2, n, k 2, o, k 3, o, n, 
o, n, o, n, k 2, o, n, ** k 4, n, o, k 2, (o 2, p 2 tog) twice. 

4. (O 2, p 2 tog) twice, o, k 9, o, n, p 27, k 5. 

5. K 3, o, n, k 4, o, n, o, n, o, * k 2, n, n, k 2, o, k 5, o, n, o, 
n, o, n, k 1, o, n, ** k 3, n, o, k 2, (o 2, p 2 tog) 3 times. 

6. (O 2, p 2 tog) 3 times, o, k 8, o, n, p 27, k 5. 

7. K 3, o, n, k 2, n, o, n, o, n, o, k 1, o, k 2, * n, k 4, n, k 2, 
o, n, o, n, o, k 3, o, n, ** k 2, n, o, k 2, (o 2, p 2 tog) 4 times. 

8. (O 2, p 2 tog) 4 times, o, k 7, o, n, p 27, k 5. 

9. K 3, o, n, k 1, n, o, n, o, n, o, k 3, o, k 2, * n, k 2, n, k 2, 
o, n, o, n, o, k 4, o, n, ** k 1, n, o, k 2, (o 2, p 2 tog) 5 times. 

10. (O 2, p 2 tog) 5 times, k 6, o, n, p 27, k 5. 

11. K 3, o, n, n, o, n, o, n, o, k 5, o, k 2, n, * n, k 2, o, n, o, 
n, o, k 5, o, n, ** n, o, k 2, (o 2, p 2 tog) 6 times. 

12. (O 2, p 2 tog) 6 times, k 5, o, n, p 27, k 5. 

13. Like 1st row to ** ; k 2, o, n, k 1, (o 2, p 2 tog) 6 times. 

14. (O 2, p 2 tog) 6 times, n, k 4, o, 11, p 27, k 5. 



56 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



15. Like 3d row to ** ; k 3, o, n, k 1, (o 2, p 2 tog) 5 times 

16. (O 2, p 2 tog) 5 times, n, k 5, o, n, p 27, k 5. 

17. Like 5th row to ** ; k 4, o, n, k 1, (o 2, p 2 tog) 4 times 

18. (O 2, p 2 tog) 4 times, n, k 6, o, n, p 27, k 5. 




Knitted Corner for Handkerchief, 

19. Like 7th row to *.* ; k 5, o, n, k 1, (o 2, p 2 tog) 3 times. 

20. (O 2, p 2 tog) 3 times, n, k 7, o, n, p 27, k 5. 

21. Like 9th row to ** ; k 6, o, n, k 1, (o 2, p 2 tog) twice. 

22. (O 2, p 2 tog) twice, n, k 8, o, n, p 27, k 5. 

23. Like nth row to ** • k 7, o, n, k 1, o, p 2 tog. 

24. N, k 10, o, n, p 27, k 5. 



KNITTED CORNER FOR HANDKERCHIEF. 57 

This completes the scallop. It takes two patterns of the insertion 
for one of the edge. When the side is of desired length, begin with 
19th row for the corner : 

1. SI and b i, then like 19th row, leaving off 1 st. 

2. Like 20th row, minus 1 st. 

3. SI and b, then like 21st row, leaving off 2 sts. 

4. Like 2 2d row. 

5. B 2 tog, then like 23d, leaving off 6 sts. 

6. Like 24th. 

7. SI and b, k 1, then from * in 1st row. 

8. Like 2d row. 

9. SI, n, and b, n, b, n, then from * in 3d row. 

Every alternate row following like even rows, decreasing as sts 
are bound off. 

11. SI and b, n then from * in 5 th row. 

13. SI and b, k 2, then from * in 7th row, 

15. SI, n and b, then from * in 9th row. 

17. SI, n and b, from * in nth row. 

19. SI, n and b, k 2, o, k 1, o, n, o, n, o, n, k 3, o, n, then from 
** in 13 th row. 

21. SI and b, k 1, o, k 3, o, n, o, n, o, n, k 2, o, n, then from 
** in 15th row. 

23. SI and b, k 5, o, n, o, n, o, n, k 1, o, n, then from ** in 
17th row. 

25, SI and b, n, k 2, o^n, o, n, o, k 3, o, n, then from ** in 
19 th row. 

27. SI, n and b, k 1, o, n, o, n, o, k 4, o, n, from ** in 21st 
row. 

29. SI and b, n, o, n, o, k 5, o, n, from ** in 23d row. 

31. SI, n and b, n, o, n, k 3, o, n, from ** in 1st row. 

33. SI, n and b, n, k 2, o, n, from ** in 3d row. 

35. SI, n and b, k 1, o, n, from ** in 5th row. 

37. SI and b, n, from ** in 7th row. 

39, SI and b, from ** in 9th row. 

41. SI and b, k 1, o, k 2, (o 2, p 2 tog) 6 times. 

42. Like 14th row. 



58 harbour's prize needle-work series. 

43. SI and b, k 1, o, n, k 1, (o 2, p 2 tog) 5 times. 
45. SI and b, k 1, o, n, k 1, (o 2, p 2 tog) 4 times. 
This finishes the binding off. For convenience we will begin at 
the first to number. 

1. (O 2, p 2 tog) 4 times, n, k 3, pick up 1 st. 

2. K 4, o, n, k 1, (o 2, p 2 tog) 3 times. 

3. (O 2, p 2 tog) 3 times, n, k 5, pick up 1 st. 

4. K 6, o, n, k 1, (o 2, p 2 tog) twice. 

5. (O 2, p 2 tog) twice, n, k 7, pick up 1 st. 

6. K 8, o, n, k 1, (o, p 2, tog). 

7. N, k 10, pick up 2 sts. 

8. N, k 5, n, o, k 2, o, 2, p 1. 

9. (O 2, p 2 tog) o, k 10, pick up 2 sts. 

10. K 1, o, n, k 4, n, o, k 2, (o 2, p 2 tog) twice. 

11. (O 2, p 2 tog) twice, o, k 9, o, n, pick up 1. 

12. K 2, o, n, k 3, n, o, k 2, (o 2, p 2 tog) 3 times. 

13- (O 2, p 2 tog) 3 times, o, k 8, o, n, p 1, pick up 1 st. 

14. K 3, o, n, like 7th row from **. 

15. Like 8th; every alternate row following like corresponding 
even rows, picking up 1 st each row, save in the 21st, 27th, 29th, 
33d, 35 th > 37 th > 4ist, 43d, 45 th > and 53d> in which 2 sts are 
picked up each row. 

16. K 4, o, n, like 9th row from **. 
18. K 5, o, n, like nth from **. 

20. K 1, o, n, k 3, o, n, like 13th from **. 

22. N, o, n, o, n, k 2, o, n, like 15th from **. 

24. K 1, o, n, o, n, o, n, k 1, o, n, like 17th from **. 

26. K 2, o, n, o, n, o, k 3, o, n, like 19th from **. 

28. N, k 2, o, n, o, n, o, k 4, o, n, like 21st from **. 

30. K 1, n, k 2, o, n, o, n, o, k 5, o, n, then like 23d from **. 

32. K 1, n, k 2, o, k 1, o, n, o, n, o, n, k 3, o, n, like 1st 
from **. 

34. K 2, n, k 2, o, k 3, o, n, o, n, o, n, k 2, o, n, like 3d 
from **. 

36. K 1, n, n, k 2, o, k 5, o, n, o, n, o, n, k 1, o, n, like 5th 
from **. 



baby's cap. 59 

38. K 1, o, k 2, n, k 4, n, k 2, o, n, o, n, o, k 3, o, n, like 7th 
from **. 

40. K 3, o, k 2, n, k 2, n, k 2, o, n, o, n, o, k 4, o, n, like 9th 
from **. 

42. Ki,o, k 5, o, k 2, n, n, k 2, o, n, o, n, o, k 5, o, n, like 
nth from **. 

44. K o, n, o, k 2, n, k 4, n, k 2, o, k 1, o, n, o, n, o, n, 
k 3, o, n, like 13th from **. 

46. K 2, o, n, o, n, o, k 2, n, k 2, n, k 2, o, k 3, o, n, o, n, o, 
n, k 2, o, n, like 15th from **. 

48. K 4, o, n, o, n, o, k 2, n, k 2, 05 k 5, o, n, o, n, o, n,ki, n, 
o, n, like 17th from **. 

50. K 5, o, n, o, n, o, k 1, o, k 2, n, k 4, n, k 2, o, n, o, n, o, k 
3, like 19th from *. 

52. K 1, o, n, k 1, n, o, n, o, n, o, k 3, o, k 2, n, k 2, n, k 2, o, 
n, o, n, o, k 4, o, n, like 21st from **. 

54. K 3, o, n, n, o, n, o, n, o, k 5, o, k 2, n, n, k 2, o, n, o, n, 
o, k 5, o, n, like 23d from *. 

This finishes the corner. Repeat the lace from 1st row to next 
corner. 

To join the ends, take stitches from needle one at a time, using a 
sewing-needle ; connect with the other edge, and the seam is hardly 
perceptible. When thoroughly conversant with the pattern, it may 
be begun in the corner with 5 stitches, a stitch being added each 
time. 

Nothing more dainty in knitted work can be imagined than this 
corner. In coarser threads it may be used for curtains, table- 
covers, etc. 

BABY'S CAP. 

[Contributed by Mrs. G. L. S alley, Orangeburg C.H., S.C.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax crochet and lace thread, in balls, 
or 3 -cord, 200-yards spools, No. 70, and tatting shuttles. 

Begin in centre of crown. Make 1 dk, 1 p (leaving loop ^ inch 
long) • until you have 9 p, then close. Around this make rings of 



60 



barbour's prize needle-work series, 



* i dk, i p, until there are 3 dk and 2 p, join to p in centre wheel, 
repeat from * and close ; turn, leave thread j{ inch long, make 
large ring of 1 dk, 1 p until there are 12 p, close; turn, make 




Baby's Cap. 



another small ring, joining in middle to loop in centre wheel, next 
1 st small ring; turn, leaving thread }{ inch long, make another 
large ring, joining to other large ring in this row by 3d loop. Repeat 
until there are 9 large rings joined to each other, and 9 small ones 
joined to loops in centre wheel. Then fasten off. 



baby's cap. 61 

Make a ring of i dk, i p, until there are 1 2 p, close \ turn, using 
2 threads, make 7 dk, then a small ring of 1 dk, 1 p, until there are 
5 p, joining centre p of small ring to centre of large ring in 2d row. 
Continue in this way until the circuit is completed. Next row is 
always made by using 2 threads. * Make 3 rings each of 10 dk, 
drawing each close and fastening together like a cloverleaf. In 
making the 2d ring of this leaf, join centre to centre of large ring in 
3d row; then with 2 threads make 1 dk, 1 p, until there are 9 p, 
turn, and repeat from * to complete circle. Around this is a row of 
rosettes like that first made, joining to each other by centre loops 
in 2 rings, and by 2 rings to scallops in last row. At back of cap 
are 2 half-rosettes, straight side down. Next row is worked also 
with 2 threads • * make a cloverleaf of 3 rings, each of 1 2 p 
separated by 1 dk, fastening firmly ■ * with 2 threads make 12 dk ; 
repeat from * to * \ join centre of middle ring in leaf on one side 
to centre of rings in rosettes of last row. This and next row, which 
consists of rosettes like 5 th row, must extend only across front of 
cap. The rosettes are joined to each other by centre of 2 rings, 
and by centre loops in 2 rings to centre loop of middle ring in 
cloverleaf of preceding row in such a manner that 7th row will be a 
little fuller than 6th. 8th row is made of 2 threads ; make a ring 
of 12 p, separated by 1 dk, using 2 threads make 7 dk, then small 
ring of 10 dk, joined in centre to large ring of last row; turn, make 
large ring of 12 p, separated by 1 dk, joining large rings together 
in 3d p. When working this row, in using 2 threads, make 7 dk 
more or less as is necessary in working on rosette of preceding row. 
This row extends around cap. 9th row is made with 2 threads ; 
1 1 p, separated by 1 dk, join in centre p of large ring in 8th row, 
and join each scallop to the other in 3d p ; this row also extends 
around cap. Finish with white baby-ribbon run in between 7th 
and 8th rows, and tied in a bow at back and on top, line with baby- 
blue silk, wadded, and add white-ribbon strings. 

It is a very dainty little cap, and easily made. Have not given 
explicit directions for tatting, as they are so fully explained in No. 1 
of the Prize Series. 



62 



barbour's prize needle-work series. 



COLLAR WITH VANDYKE POINTS. 

[Contributed by Emma S. Thomas, Schoharie, N.Y.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. ioo, 3-cord, 200- 
yards spools, and ordinary shuttle. 

Begin in centre of wheel, 1 dk, 1 p, repeat until there are 9 p, 
close ; small rings on outside, 4 p each separated by 1 dk, close, 




Collar with Vandyke Points. 

allow ^ in h of thread and join to centre ring. Repeat around, 
having 9 small rings in the complete wheel. To shape the collar, 
join 24 wheels together by 2 p on each side, leaving 2 rings above 
and 3 below. This forms a half-circle for about the neck. Form 



REVERSIBLE DOILY. 63 

the points by joining 7 wheels, first 3, then 2, then 1, and 1 below 
this. To make frill for edge, make 66 wheels with ten small rings 
on outside, joining by 2 rings on either side. Heading for frill is 
made thus : 3 p, separated by one dk, joining these small rings at 
sides ; between each wheel allow ^ inch of thread, joining to large 
wheel by centre p of each small ring on upper side of large wheel, 
and also the 2 p between large wheels. Continue this until 3 rows of 
heading are made, when with shuttle and thread join to collar. 
Finish around neck with small wheels like those around outer edge 
of large wheels, joined the same as the heading. 

By making long picots a " lacey " appearance is given this work, 
which renders it very attractive, and also much more rapidly done. 



REVERSIBLE DOILY. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Ella H. Cooper, 248 E. Main Street, Meriden, Conn.] 

Materials : Two skeins Barbour's flax embroidery floss, size 4, 1 
skein white and 1 of yellow, and a tatting-shuttle. Fill the shuttle 
with the yellow floss and wind the white upon a spool. 

Tie yellow and white threads together. With white, make 1 dk, 
1 p, 1 dk ; with yellow, 6 dk, 1 p, 4 dk, 1 p, 4 dk, 1 p, 4 dk, 1 p, 
4 dk, 1 p, 6 dk, close. With white, 1 dk, 1 p, 1 dk. Yellow, 6 dk, 
join to last p (counting always in the order in which they were 
made) in preceding ring (4 dk, 1 p) 4 times, 6 dk, close. Con- 
tinue till a wheel of 8 rings is formed, connecting last with 1st, and 
fasten off. Thread a needle with the white thread at starting-point 
and draw all white picots together in centre of wheel. 

Tie both threads together to 2d p in a ring; with white (4 dk, 1 
p) 5 times, with yellow (4 dk, 1 p) 4 times, 4 dk, close ; with 
yellow (4 dk, 1 p) 6 times, 4 dk, close \ with white (4 dk, 1 p) 
4 times, 4 dk ; with yellow (4 dk, 1 p) 7 times, 4 dk, close ; with 
white (4 dk, 1 p) 4 times, 4 dk, join to 4th p of ring last made ; 
with yellow (4 dk, 1 p) 4 times, 4 dk, close \ with white (4 dk, 1 
p) 5 times, 4 dk, join to 4th p of ring in wheel, and again to 2d p 
of adjoining ring in wheel; with white (4 dk, 1 p) 4 times, 4 dk; 



64 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

with yellow, 4 dk, 1 p, 4 dk, join to 3d p of ring last made, 4 dk, 1 
p, 4 dk, 1 p, 4 dk, close ; with yellow (4 dk, 1 p) 7 times, close ; 
with white (4 dk, 1 p) 4 times, 4 dk * with yellow, 4 dk, 1 p, 4 dk, 
1 p, 4 dk, join to 3d p of ring last made, 6 dk, join to 1st p of ring 




Reversible Doily. 

last made, 4 dk, 1 p, 4 dk, 1 p, 4 dk, close ; with white (4 dk, 1 
p) 4 times, 4 dk, join to 4th p of next to last ring made ; with 
yellow (4 dk, 1 p) 5 times, 4 dk, close ; with white (4 dk, 1 p) 
4 times, 4 dk, join to 4th p of 2d ring in wheel. This completes 
% of square. In finishing join last to 1st ring and fasten ends 
with needle. 

Cut 2 6-inch squares of linen, 1 of white and 1 of yellow, feather- 



REVERSIBLE DOILY. 65 

stitch each ^ inch from edge, white on yellow and yellow on 
white \ pin out the tatting and measure it, cut from centre of linen 
squares pieces large enough to allow insertion of tatted square, turn 
in edge, and feather-stitch, sew the squares together, overseaming 
with fine thread, and fringe the outer edge. If preferred, the doily 
may be hemstitched, and white floss used throughout instead of 
yellow. Crocheted, antique, or other squares may be used instead 
of tatted ones. The idea is a novel one and may be elaborated to 
any extent. Ecru and white flax thread may be used instead of the 
floss if preferred. 

The making of tatting may be much facilitated by the move- 
ment known as the " dip," where the shuttle is held vertically and 
the " throwing " of the thread dispensed with. In learning to make 
tatting, 2 threads of different colors should be employed, although 
2 shuttles (save for very elaborate designs) are not required. For 
example, take the floss as used in the doily, tie threads together, 
hold knot firmly between thumb and forefinger of left hand, from 
this point pass the white thread over the left hand, extending the 
middle finger so as to have at least an inch space between it and 
the forefinger, and secure the thread from slipping by winding 6 or 
7 times around the little finger. Now, take the shuttle between 
thumb and forefinger of right hand, as near the upper points as con- 
venient, holding it vertically, and with the thread extending down- 
ward from the right. Have about 6 inches of thread between knot 
and shuttle. Extend 3d finger of right hand under this thread, 
bringing hands together until the shuttle strikes against the white 
thread between fore and middle fingers ; lower shuttle, permitting 
white thread to pass between it and forefinger of right hand, till the 
upper points of the shuttle have cleared this thread. Then bring 
shuttle up again, white thread passing this time between it and 
thumb of right hand, but never permitting shuttle to drop from 
between thumb and forefinger, and always maintaining its vertical 
position. So soon as the shuttle begins its upward journey, draw 
middle finger of left hand in toward the palm, and the shuttle 
thread straight to the right, leaving white thread in a loose knot 
upon it To adjust and tighten this knot, again extend middle 



66 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

finger of left hand, when the half " double knot" (dk) will appear, 
white upon colored thread. The 2d half is made with shuttle in 
same vertical position, but with colored thread allowed to lie in a 
loose loop falling toward palm ; moreover, the shuttle is lowered on 
further side of white thread, so that this thread passes first between 
thumb and shuttle, and on upward movement of shuttle slips 
between it and forefinger. Here, as before, the middle finger of 
left hand is relaxed while the shuttle thread is drawn tight to the 
right ; again the middle finger is extended, adjusting this half knot 
beside the 1st. Knots made in this way cannot be drawn up in 
a ring ■ they appear white upon colored thread, should be pushed 
close together, and are used to form the connecting bars or " scal- 
lops " in making lace. It is well to practise making these bars till 
perfectly familiar with the process before attempting to make the 
closed rings. The same manipulations are used in both, only the 
difference in color enables the beginner to detect errors and avoid 
forming the knots with the wrong thread. To make the rings, ignore 
the white thread, which may be left wound around little finger, the 
latter drawn in toward the palm. Unwind 1 2 inches of thread from 
shuttle, place work between thumb and forefinger of left hand with 
thumb nail close to last white knot of bar, pass thread around and 
over extended middle and 3d fingers and again under thumb nail, 
leaving an inch or so space between fore and middle fingers for 
operations of shuttle, which is used as before. Make as many dk 
as pattern calls for, leaving spaces where picots are required. If 
shuttle has been drawn properly to right, and the left middle finger 
done its work of tightening and adjusting knots, there will be no 
difficulty in closing rings. The work is joined by picots ; slip 
shuttle in palm of right hand, leaving work in left undisturbed, with 
a pin draw through picot to which work is to be joined a loop of 
the thread between 1st and middle finger of left hand, making this 
long enough to allow shuttle to pass through, when the work is 
immediately readjusted by the all-important left middle finger. In 
giving these directions I have presupposed no knowledge of tat- 
ting on the part of the learner, and trust many may be benefited 
thereby. 



DEPARTMENT 3 



ANTIQUE CURTAINS. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Emma Roberton, 217 W. 142c! Street, New York, N. Y.] 

Materials for curtains : 4 dozen spools, No. 40, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, 3 dozen skeins Ulster white flossette size *, meshes and netting- 
needle No. 14. 

1. With inch-mesh, 720 sts. 

2. With small mesh (knitting-needle), plain. Repeat, making 
21 rows. 

3. Large mesh, plain. 

4. Large mesh, 1 loop in 2. 

5. Large mesh, 2 loops in 1. This forms open stripe. 

Repeat from 2d row until 6 stripes are made. After the last 
openwork stripe, net with small mesh, plain, 84 rows. For scallop, 
with large mesh, net 14 sts in 1, missing 9. Finish with small mesh, 
2 rows, catching in 5th st between scallops. 

The pattern darned on the wide stripe is the rose, thistle, and 
shamrock, and the centre, with openwork stripes, represents the 
" Stars and Stripes," the whole being emblematic of the countries, 
America, England, Scotland, and Ireland. The stars are darned on 
the plain stripes between openwork. The whole design is extremely 
effective, the work simple and easily copied. A design patent has 
been applied for, as it is the purpose of the designer to prevent its 
being taken up and produced in large quantities by the manufact- 
urers of cheap lace curtains. 

For netting, No. 40 thread is used, for darning, the flossette. 
Netting is such easy and delightful work, requiring little attention 
of the eyes, that its revival and constant growth in popularity is not 
to be wondered at. Draperies netted of Barbour's Irish flax threads 
are practically indestructible — by all ordinary wear and tear — 



# Iff H 



**« 



* 













(68) 



ANTIQUE CURTAINS. 



69 



losing nothing of their elegance by careful laundering; and it is 
hoped that these exquisite curtains will inspire other ladies with the 




Antique Curtains, 



laudable desire to possess similar artistic hangings for their windows. 
Made to order, they are in use in the most elegant parlors. 



70 



barbour's prize needle-work series, 



NETTED CENTRE-PIECE OR TIDY. 

[Contributed by Mrs. F. E. Parker, Everett, Wash.] 

Materials : One spool Barbour's Irish flax thread, 3 -cord, 200- 
yards spools, No. 150, 4 skeins Barbour's floss, No. 8, fine netting- 
needle, lead pencil, and sock-needle. 




Netted Centre- Piece or Tidy. 



Commence with 36 stitches over the large mesh (lead pencil) 
into a loop of thread. Pin this loop to a pillow. 

Net 5 rows over small mesh (sock-needle) ; then once around 
over large mesh, putting the loops in every other stitch; once 
around over large mesh, putting 4 loops in every stitch ; then 8 



NETTED COLLAR. 71 

times on small mesh, repeat open work, 9 times on small mesh, 
repeat open work, 9 times on small mesh. This completes the 
plain circle. 

Finish with 15 points. These are made by netting back and 
forth, leaving the last stitch each time until but one remains. The 
stitches should be divisible by 15 in the last row, but as they are 
not, by 3, these 3 stitches must be disposed of in the last widening, 
so there will be 3 groups in the last row of the open work that will 
have 3 instead of 4 stitches. 

The pattern is simply darned in with the No. 8 floss, weaving 
back and forth, using a sewing-needle which will carry the floss 
smoothly. 

Made of coarser thread, this design is a beautiful tidy or hassock- 
cover; No. 35 or NOc 40 is excellent for this purpose. 



NETTED COLLAR. 

[Contributed by Mrs A. J, Truan, Smithwood, Knox Co., Tenn.] 

Materials : Three spools Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 80, 
3-cord, 200-yards spools, medium size netting-needle, lead pencil, 
and coarse knitting-needle, 

1. Net over pencil 150 loops, plain. 

2. Over needle, taking 2 sts each time of 1st row. 

3. 4, 5. Plain, over needle. 

6. Over pencil, make meshes of 18 loops, merely passing net- 
ting-needle upward through netting, then over pencil, making the 
loops y<z inch long. To form a firm knot over these 18 loops, after 
passing upward for last loop, pass the needle downward to left of 
mesh, or collection of loops, draw thread through till small loop 
is left to right of mesh, pass needle up through this loop, drawing 
thread firmly over the mesh at about }£ inch from netting of pre- 
vious row. Repeat, to secure mesh firmly ; net 5 plain,, over pencil, 
then repeat mesh. 

7. Over knitting-needle, in plain netting, divide mesh in 3 parts, 
taking 6 loops each st, and net plain between meshes. 



72 



bArbour's prize needle-work series, 



8, g, io, ii, 12, 13. Plain, over knitting-needle. 

14. Mesh, as in 6th row, in every other st. 

15. Plain, over needle, dividing loops in 3 parts. 

16. 17. Plain, over needle. 




Netted Collar. 



18. Meshes of 18 loops, inch long, over needle, 5 plain sts 
between. 

19. Plain, over needle, dividing meshes in 2 parts. 

20. 21, 22, 23. Plain, over needle. 

24. Meshes of 20 loops, over pencil, 5 plain between. 

25. Plain, over pencil, dividing meshes in 2 equal parts. 

26. Plain, over pencil, except in st made to divide the mesh is 
made 4 sts. 



lady's netted tie. 73 

27. Over needle, plain except the 4 sts made in same st in 
previous row are netted together. 

28, 29, 30, 31. Plain, over needle. 

32. Meshes of 24 loops, over pencil, 1 plain st between. 

33. Plain, over needle, dividing meshes in 4 parts of 6 loops 
each, taking 1st 6 of 2d mesh with last 6 of preceding mesh. 

34. 35, 36. Plain netting, over needle. 

Border: 1. Meshes over pencil, about V^ inch long, 24 loops, 
missing 3 sts between ; at corners, in front, meshes have 48 loops 
each. 

2. Plain, over needle, dividing each mesh in 8 parts ; between 
meshes pass thread under needle to avoid making st. 

3. Meshes, 1 inch long, over peucil, taken in netting between 
4th and 5th divisions of 1st row of meshes ; corners, 48 loops. 

4. Like 2d row. 

5. 6. Plain, over needle. 

If collar is thought too wide, rows 22 to 31 may be omitted. In 
26th row the 4 long sts under meshes are buttonhole-stitched all 
around, taking half on each side, making 5 sts above and 5 below. 
Neck is finished by netting together over needle 2 sts of 1st row, 
then 3 rows plain, over needle, finish with border like other part 
and front. 



LADY'S NETTED TIE. 

[Contributed by Mrs. E. Martin, Gallipolis, Ohio. J 

Materials : Two spools Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 90, and 
rather fine netting-needle. 

1. Net 40 sts on mesh yz inch round. 

2. * Plain netting on size larger mesh. 

3. Net 2d st, then 1st, and so continue to end of row, on smaller 
mesh. 

4. * Like 2d row. 

5. Net plain st, begin pattern by netting 3d st, then 2d, next 
the 5th st, then 4th, on smaller mesh. 



74 BARBOUR*S prize needle-work SERIES. 

Repeat from * until you have 1% yards, or as long as desired 
for tie. 




Lady's Netted Tie. 

For border : Take up sts for border ; net 7 sts in every other st 
on mesh 1 inch round. Next net plain row on fine knitting-needle. 
Net 4 sts on same mesh, then 1 st on mesh size larger. Continue, 
decreasing to make points, and having 6 rows in border. 



BOBBIN WORK. 



The introduction of this work in No. 3 of the " Prize Series " has 
been the means of awakening much interest in a method of lace- 
making hitherto comparatively unknown in our country. That 



BOBBIN WORK. 



O 



attention has not been previously drawn to it is a matter of surprise 
to ladies with whom it is now so popular. The work is fascinating, 
yet simple, the art of weaving the lace being readily acquired by 
any one ; and the only expense for materials is in the initial purchase 
of bobbins, desk, etc. After a little practice one can readily prick 
out one's own patterns, combining different grounds, explicit illus- 
trated directions for several of which in common use were given in 
No. 3. This issue also contains detailed instructions for working, 
which it seems unnecessary to repeat. One fact, however, cannot 
be too often or too strongly impressed upon our friends — the ap- 
plication being made to laces of every description : the flax threads 
should alone and always be used. It is extremely unwise, to say the 
least, to expend time and energy in the production of cotton lace. 
Indeed, for bobbin work, as has been previously stated, cotton 
thread is not to be used, as it renders the lace stiff and wiry, with 




Lace Desk. (Fig. 1.) 



none of the smoothness and lustre characteristic of Barbour's Irish 
flax threads. 

The lace-desk used by the writer has a revolving upholstered 
cylinder, sufficiently long to allow the weaving of a wide pattern. 
The bobbins are used in pairs, and numbered from the left as they 



76 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

lie at time of using. There are but two movements, with which 
all " stitches " are formed; these are the twist, consisting simply in 
laying the right bobbin of each pair over left of same pair, and the 
cross, laying the right bobbin of left pair over left of right pair. 
Or, taking the four bobbins as they lie, to twist, lay 4th and 2d 
toward the left over 3d and 1st; and " cross " 2d over 3d. These 
movements, once, form the half-throw, or ht ; repeat to form whole 
throw (wt). Directions are given for repetitions, etc., in forming 
different lace-patterns. 

The same pattern is made in many different widths. For example, 
that shown on the lace-desk (Fig. 1) in No. 80 Irish flax thread is 
dainty and delicate, less than an inch in width. In No. 35 of the 
same thread it is nearly two inches wide. The different patterns 
may be easily enlarged or made smaller by means of point paper, 
pricking at the intersection of lines. This work is being utilized in 
many ways. One lady writes of having reseated some chairs from 
which the cane had broken ; she had a light, smooth board, punc- 
tured to form the pattern for " plain hole ground " (page 78, No. 3 
of the " Prize Series "), used wire nails for pins, and wove the ground 
of 9-cord flax macrame. Another lady has bobbined some beautiful 
draperies, weaving the ground in strips and sewing together, with 
lace for the edge. 

By carefully following directions given, we feel sure no difficulty 
will be experienced by the beginner. We are, however, always glad 
to give any assistance or information possible. 



CHRISTINA EDGING. 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 60, 3 -cord, 200-yards 
spools, 9 pairs bobbins, pattern and lace-desk. Pin pattern around 
cylinder. Pin 4 pairs at 1, 3 pairs at 2, and 2 pairs at 3. 

Make 2 wt with 1st and 2d pairs, same with 2d and 3d, 5th and 
6th; take 3d and 4th pairs in left hand and 5th and 6th in right, 
etc, using a pair as single bobbin, pin in 1, etc; 2 wt with 3d and 
4th, serine with 1st and 2d; wt with 1st and 2d and 3d and 4th, 



DANISH LACE AND INSERTION. 



i i 



using a pair as single bobbin (hereafter this movement will be 
referred to as " dwt " — double whole throw), pin in 2, dwt; 2 wt 

with 5th and 6th; tw 7th 

twice, etc with 5th, 6th and 

7 th, using 5 th and 6th pairs 

as single bobbin, pin in 3, 

etc; dwt with 3d, 4th, 5th 

and 6th, pin in 4, dwt ; dwt 

with 1st, 2d, 3d and 4th, pin 

in 5, dwt; tw 7th once, etc 

with 7 th and 8th; wt 6th, 

etc with 6th and 7th; same 

with 5th and 6th, pin in 6, 

etc ; tw 7 th, etc w T ith 6th and 

7th; same with 7th and 8th, 

8th and 9th, pin in 7, etc; 

tw 7 th, etc with 7 th and 8th, 

same with 6th and 7 th, pin 

in 8, etc ; etc with 6th and 

7th, 7 th and 8th, 8th and 

9th, pin in 9, etc ; etc with 

7th and 8th, pin in 10, etc; etc with 8th and 

9th, pin in n, etc; etc with 7th and 8th, pin in 
12, etc; etc w T ith 8th and 9th, pin in 13, etc; etc with 6th and 
7th, pin in 14, etc; 8th and 9th, pin in 15, etc; 5th and 6th, pin 
in 16 ; 8th and 9th, pin in 17. 

This pattern is very. simple, and desirable for children's garments. 





Pattern. 



Christina Edging - . 



DANISH LACE AND INSERTION. 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 35, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, 8 pairs bobbins, bobbin-lace desk and pattern. Pin pattern 
around cylinder. Pin 2 pairs in 24, 15, and 20, 1 pair in 18 and 
19. Ht with 1st and 2d pairs, pin in 1, ht; tw 2d 3 times, 3d 
twice, ht, pin in 2, ht ; tw 3d and 4th, ht, pin in 3, ht ; 4th and 5th, 



78 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



same, pin in 4; tw 5th twice, etc with 5 th and 6th; etc with 6th 
and 7th, 5th and 6th; tw 4th and 5th, twice, ht, pin in 5, ht ; 3d 
and 4th, same, pin in 6 ; 2d and 3d, same, pin in 7 ; tw 1st and 2d 
3 times, ht, pin in 8, ht ; tw 2d 3 times, 3d twice, pin in 9, ht ; tw 
3d and 4th twice, ht, pin in 10, ht; 4th and 5th, same, pin in 11 ; 
tw 5th and 6th twice, etc, pin in 12, between 3d and 4th bobbins, 
leaving 1 thread to right and 3 to left, etc, pin in 13, same way, etc; 
the single picot loops are formed thus. Tw 4th and 5th twice, ht, 
pin in 14, ht ; 3d and 4th, same, pin in 15 ; 2d and 3d, same, pin 
in 16 ; tw 1st and 2d 3 times, ht, pin in 17, ht; tw 2d 3 times, 3d 
twice, ht, pin in 18, ht ; tw 3d and 4th twice, ht, pin in 19, ht ; 4th 
and 5th, same, pin in 20 ; etc with 7th and 8th, pin between 3d and 
4th threads, as before, in 21, etc ; same ; pin in 22, etc ; pin in 23 ; 




1 

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Danish Lace. 



Pattern. 



between 3d and 4th threads, etc; etc with 6th and 7th, 7th and 8th, 
5th and 6th, 6th and 7th ; ht with 5th and 6th. Repeat from 1st. 

For the ^insertion, follow same directions as to pinning in pattern. 
Beginning with 2d and 3d, wt ; tw 1st and 2d twice, etc, pin in 1, 
etc; tw 2d twice, etc with 2d and 3d, pin in 2, etc; tw 2d twice, 



QUEEN LACE 



etc with i st and 2d, pin in 3, etc ; tw 2d twice, wt with 2d and 3d ; 
2 wt with 4th and 5th; wt with 6th and 7th; tw 7th and 8th twice, 



\ f 1 f I 




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BAflBDUR'S PR LZE NEEDLE WDFW BOOK ND.4-_ 




Danish Insertion, 



Pattern. 



etc, pin in 4, etc ; tw 7th twice, etc with 6th and 7th, pin in 5, etc ; 
tw 7th twice, etc with 7th and 8th, pin in 6, etc; tw 7th twice, wt 
with 6th and 7th ; ht with 5th and 6th, pin in 7, ht ; wt with 6th and 
7th ; ht with 3d and 4th, pin in 8, ht ; same with 4th and 5th, pin 
in 9 ; same with 5th and 6th, pin in 10 ; wt with 6th and 7th. 



QUEEN LACE. 

Materials; Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 60, 3-cord, 200 yards 
spools, 2 7 pairs of bobbins, bobbin-lace desk and pattern. Pin pat- 
tern around cylinder. Pin 4 pairs at 99, 2 at 152, and 1 pair at 
100, 98, 97, 94, 93, 90, 89, 86, 85, 48, 116, 118, 137, 139, 158, 
160, 168, 170, 171, 166, 163. 

This design, which is a remarkably delicate and pretty one, is com- 



80 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



posed of pin-check and linen grounds, the latter used in the diamond 
pattern. Begin with ist diamond. 

Ht with 12th and 13th pairs, pin in i,ctc; etc with 13th and 
14th, pin in 2, etc; the diamond beginning to enlarge, work to left 
(always with etc in this ground), taking in nth pair, pin in 3; 
work back and forth, taking in 16th pair at widest part, pin in 6, 
to right, and 9th pair, pin in 7 to left. Decrease by dropping a 
pair each time, until you pin in 12, between 12th and 13th. As 
the 4 diamonds are made in the same way, it is only necessary 
to state with what pairs they are begun. For the openwork 
between, tw 9th and 10th pairs, ht, same with nth and 12th; 
begin 2d diamond, to left, with 8th and 9th pairs, proceeding 
as with 1 st diamond; pin in 24 at finish. Tw 5 th and 6th, ht, 

same with 7 th and 8th, 
9th and 10th, nth and 
12 th, 13 th and 14th, 
15th and 1 6th : this for 
openwork. Begin 3d 
diamond, to right, with 
1 6th and 17 th pairs, 
proceeding as before, 
pin in 36 at finish.. For 
openwork, tw 15 th and 
1 6th pairs and ht, same 
with 13 th and 14th. 
Begin 4th diamond with 
1 2th and 13th, ending 
Pattern, with same and pin in 

48 ; openwork, tw 9th 
and 10th pairs and ht, same with nth and 12th, 13th and 14th, 
15 th and 1 6th, 17th and 18th, 19th and 20th. 

Beginning on edge, * etc with 2d and 3d pairs, tw ist pair 3 
times, 2d once, etc, pin in 49, etc, etc with 2d and 3d; * beginning 
pin-check ground, ht with 3d and 4th, 4th and 5th, pin in 50, 
ht; ht with 3d and 4th, pin in 51, ht ; edge (* to *), pin in 52. 
Ht with 5th and 6th, pin in 53, ht ; same with 4th and 5th, pin in 



.' V 33 



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8 -8.W-° %X:^f -48 

Q, 9 -* 9 « •<68-.6 9 -, 6 £ 3 



BARBOUR'S. PRIZE WEEDLE_WaRHBDQRN04 



qUEEN LACE. 



81 



54, ht with 5th and 6th, ht with 3d and 4th, pin in 55, ht; edge, 
pin in 56 ; ht with 3d and 4th, ht with 6th and 7th, pin in 57, ht ; 
same with 5 th and 6 th, 
pin in 58, 7th and 8th, 
pin in 59, 6th and 7th, 
pin in 60. It will be 
seen that we are work- 
ing on a square. After 
a little practice this 
ground will be thor- 
oughly understood, and 
is one of the prettiest. 
Ht with 5 th and 6 th, 
4th and 5 th, pin in 61, 
ht ; same with 3d and 
4th, pin in 62, same with 
5th and 6th, pin in 6t, } 
4th and 5th, pin in 64 ; 
then htwith 3d and 4th, 
without pin, edge, pin 
in 65 ; ht with 3d and 
4th, pin in 66, edge, 
pin in 67, ht with 3d 
and 4th, 5 th and 6 th, 
7th and 8th; ht with 8th 
and 9th, pin in 68 , and 
proceed to work toward 

edge, 3 checks, as described for the 2 checks above, diagonally, 
putting pin in 79, at finish ; ht with 3d and 4th, edge, pin in 80 ; ht 
with 3d and 4th, pin in 81, edge, pin in 82 ; ht with 3d and 4th, 
5th and 6th, 7th and 8th, 9th and 10th, ht with 10th and nth, pin 
in 83, ht, and work to left as before, 4 checks, finishing with pin in 
98 ; ht with 3d and 4th, edge, pin in 99 ; ht with 3d and 4th, pin 
in 100, ht. This completes the upper part of design. For an 
insertion to match this lace, make the other edge the same. 

Work to right as for openwork between diamonds, ht with 5 th and 




Queen Lace. 



82 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

6th, 7th and 8th, 9th and 10th, nth and 12th. Ht with 21st and 
22d, pin in ioi, ht; 23d and 24th same, pin in 102 ; etc with 22d 
and 23d; ht with 21st and 22d, same with 20th and 21st, pin in 
103, ht; same with 19th and 20th, pin in 104; 21st and 22d, pin 
in 105, 20th and 21st, pin in 106 ; ht with 19th and 20th; proceed 
to make 3 checks, diagonally, to left, as previously described, finish- 
ing with pin in 118, between 14th and 15 th pairs. Working to 
right, ht with 13th and 14th, 15 th and 16th, 17th and 18th, 19th 
and 20th, 21st and 22d. Ht with 24th and 25th, pin in 119, ht ; 
same with 25th and 26th, pin in 120; etc with 26th and 27th, pin 
in 121, etc ; etc with 2 2d and 23d. Ht with 23d and 24th, pin in 
122, ht, same with 24th and 25th, pin in 123, 25th and 26th, pin in 
124. Ctc with 2 2d and 23d, ht with 21st and 2 2d, pin in 125, ht ; 
etc with 2 2d and 23d, ht with 23d and 24th, pin in 126, ht, same 
with 24th and 25th, pin in 127, ht with 21st and 2 2d, 20th and 
2 1 st, pin in 128, ht ; continue, working 3 checks to left, as before, 
finishing with pin in 139, between 16th and 17th pairs. Work back 
to right, as before, beginning with 15th and 16th, ht, 17th and 18th, 
19th and 20th, 21st and 2.2 d. Ctc with 22d and 23d, ht with 23d 
and 24th, pin in 140, ht; ctc with 22d and 23d; ht with 21st and 
2 2d, pin in 141, ht; ctc with 2 2d and 23d, beginning scallop, ctc 
with 24th and 25th, tw each pair once, tw 25th and 26th, ctc, same 
with 26th and 27th, pin in 142, tw once, ctc; tw 25th and 26th, 
ctc, 24th and 25th same, pin in 143; repeat to right, pin in 144, 
then left, dropping 24th, pin in 145 ; to right, pin in 146 ; to left, 
taking in 24th again, pin in 147 ; to right, pin in 148 ; to left, ctc 
with 23d and 24th, pin in 149, ctc; ht with 24th and 25th, pin in 
150; same with 25th and 26th, pin in 151, 26th and 27th, pin in 
152; ctc with 22d and 23d, ht with 21st and 22d; ht with 20th 
and 2 1 st, pin in 153, ht, and proceed to work 2 checks to left, as 
before, finishing with pin in 160, between 18th and 19th pairs. Ht 
with 19th and 20th, 20th and 21st; ctc with 22d and 23d, ht with 
23d and 24th, pin in 161; ht with 24th and 25th, pin in 162 ; 
25th and 26th, pin in 163 ; ctc with 22d and 23d, ht with 21st and 
22d, pin in 164, ht ; ctc with 22d and 23d, ht with 23d and 24th, 
pin in 165, ht; same with 24th and 25th, pin in 166; ht with 



BLOCK LACE. 



83 



2 1 st and 2 2d, ht with 20th and 21st, pin in 167, ht, same with 19th 
and 20th, pin in 16 8, 21st and 2 2d, pin in 169, 20th and 21st, pin 
in 170; ht with 21st and 2 2d, etc with 2 2d and 23d, ht with 23d 
and 24th, pin in 171 etc; this finishes the pattern. 



BLOCK LACE. 



[Contributed by Mrs. C. A. Stone, Box 257, Holliston, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 35, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, 19 pairs bobbins, lace-desk, pins, and pattern. Pin pattern 
around cylinder. Then pin 3 pairs of bobbins in 65, 2 pairs in 66, 
67, 68, and 52, and 1 pair in 69, 71, 75, 77, 79, 80, and 81. 

This design consists of plain net ground (in block), tulle ground, 
like twisted hole ground, save that a wt is used instead of ht, and 
bar ground, in scallop. 

Beginning with tulle ground at top of pattern, * tw 3d and 4th pairs 
twice, wt, pin in 1 
wt ; * repeat with 
5 th and 6th, pin in 2, 
7 th and 8th, pin in 
3. On the edge, 
tw 2d and 3d 
1 st 



** 






once, wt, tw 



twice, 2d once, wt, 
pin in 4, wt; tw 2d 
and 3d, wt. **. Re- 
peat from * to * with 
4th and 5 th, pin in 
5, 6th and 7th, pin 
in 6, 3d and 4th, 





. 












23 


21 


19 


17 


15 13 


1 


2 


3 




26 


25 




• 


• 


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• • 14 


7 

• 


6 

• 

8 

• 


• 

30 

• 


28 

• 


• 


• 
■ 


• 

e 


.9 

• 






16 

• 

18 


9 10 

■ • 


32 

• 












31 

• 






• 
2D 


II 

• 


34 

• 














33 




• 
22 


12 36 

38 


















35 

• 

37 


• 


52 * 40 


















39 


6?' - 


• • 


















• 


71 


53 

• 


42 

• 














41 

• - 




73 


54 55 


44 

• 












43 

• 






7 P 


5.6 


57 


46 










^ 






77 


58 59 


60 




48 






47 








• 


61 

• 


62 

• 


63 

• 


• 


5.0 c 


49 

• 


• 

68 


7D 


72 


74 


79 

76 7 8 In 


64 65 

• • 


66 

• 




67 

• 


- 


>.' 8, 


1 # 


• 


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BARBOUR'S 










DK 


^Q.4 









Pattern. 



pin 111 
II, 



pin in 7, 5th and 6th, pin in 8; repeat from ** to ** 
9 ; from * to * with 4th and 5th, pin in 10, 3d and 4th, pin in 
from ** to ** pin in 12. 

On scallop, tw 18th and 19th once, etc, pin in 13, etc; tw 19th 5 



84 



barbour's prize needle-work series, 



times, 1 8th once, pin in 14, etc ; tw 17th once, 18th 3 times, etc, 
pin in 15, etc ; tw 18th 3 times, 19th once, etc, pin in 16, tw 19th 

5 times, 1 8th once, 
etc ; work to left, 
taking in 16th pair; 
then to right, as be- 
fore. Continue work- 
ing back and forth 
until you take in 13th 
pair to left, pin in 23. 
To right, as before, 
pin in 24, and put 
aside. This is half of 
scallop. 

Working on block, 
tw 1 2 th twice, ht with 
nth and 12th, pin in 
25, ht ; ht with 10th 
and nth, tw 9 th 
twice, ht with 9th and 
10th, pin in 26, ht; 
work back and forth, 
taking in a pair on 
each side, this pair 
being twisted twice 
before taking in, until 
the block is from 3d 
to 1 8th pair, inclu- 
sive, wide. Then be- 
gin to decrease, drop- 
ping a pair each time, 
without twisting, until 
we get to io.th and 




Block Lace. 



nth, pin in 51, completing the block. 

To finish the tulle ground, repeat from 
with 3d and 4th, repeat from * to *, pin in 53; 



#* 



to **, pin in 52 ; 
from ** to **, 



ZIGZAG LACE. 85 

pin in 54; with 4th and 5th, from * to *, pin in 55, 3d and 4th, 
pin in 56, 5th and 6th, pin in 5 7 ; from ** to **, pin in 58; 
with 4th and 5th, from * to *, pin in 59, 6th and 7th, pin 
in 60, 3d and 4th, pin in 61, 5th and 6th, pin in 62, 7th 
and 8th, pin in 63 ; ** to **, pin in 64 • with 4th and 5th, * to *, 
pin in 65, 6th and 7th, pin in 66, 8th and 9th, pin in 67 ; wt 
with 10th and nth. 

Finishing scallop, tw 19th 5 times, 18th once, etc; tw 17th 
and 1 8th 3 times, etc, 16th and 17th, 15th and 16th, 14th and 
15th, 13th and 14th, same, pin in 68, etc; to right, tw 14th 3 
times, 15th once, etc, work to right in same way, pin in 69, tw 
19th 5 times, 1 8th once, etc. Continue working back and forth, 
dropping a pair to left each time, until you pin in 79, between 18th 
and 19th. Tw 17th twice, 18th 3 times, etc, 16th and 17th, 15th 
and 1 6th, 14th and 15th, 13th and 14th, 12th and 13th, same, pin 
in 80, etc; to right, tw 13th 3 times, 14th once, etc, repeat same to 
1 8th and 19th, pin in 81. 

As the pattern is begun, the tulle ground is worked straight across, 
which necessitates missing alternate pairs of bobbins ; diagonally, 
each pair would be used with the same effect. 



ZIGZAG LACE, 



[Contributed by Mrs. Marie Howley, 51 Clayton Street, Dorchester, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 70, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, 26 pairs of bobbins, lace-desk, pins, and pattern. Fasten 
pattern around cylinder, as usual. 

Pin 5 pairs each in 112 and 82, 48 pairs each in 113, St, } and 
76, 2 pairs each at 99 and 91. 

This design consists of net ground, open twisted hole ground, and 
"spiders." Beginning with net ground in scallop, tw 13th pair 
3 times, 14th once, ht, pin in 1, ht to close; work to right, ht 
with 25th and 26th, pin in 2, ht ; to left, drop 13th, ht with 14th 
and 15 th, pin in 3, ht. Continue to work in this way, dropping 



86 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



«* * & ■?.-', 




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BARBOUR^ PRIZE NEEDLE WORK BOOK, NO. 4 









Pattern. 



i pair to left each time, until you pin in 16 on edge work to left, 
ht with 2 1 st and 2 2d, and put aside. 

In the open hole zigzag, tw 12th twice, 13th 3 times, ht, pin in 
17, ht; use 13th and 14th same way, pin in 18, and so on down to 
point of scallop, using 19th and 20th, pin in 24. On upper side of 

zigzag, tw nth and 12th 
twice, ht, pin in 25, ht; 
use 1 2th and 13th same 
way, and so on, working 
down to 1 8th and 19th, 
pin in 32, close, with ht. 

Working the net ground 

zigzag, tw 8th pair once, 

9th 3 times, ht, pin in ^^ 9 

ht; work to left, ht with 

4th and 5th, pin in 34, ht; 

to right, take in 10th, which 

tw 3 times, then to left, dropping off 4th. Work in this way to the 

point, using 15th and 16th, pin in 47; to left, ht with nth and 

1 2th, put aside. 

On the edge use 3 pairs, as follows : * tw 2d and 3d twice, etc, tw 
1st 3 times, 2d once, etc ; pin in 48, etc; tw 2d once, 3d twice, 
etc. * Tw 3d twice, 4th 3 times, ht, pin in 49, ht. Repeat from 
* to *, putting pin in 50. Tw 4th twice, 5th 3 times, ht, pin in 
51, ht ; tw 3d and 4th twice, ht, pin in 52, ht ; repeat edge, pin 
in 53 ; tw 6th 3 times, 5th twice, ht, pin in 54, ht ; tw 4th and 5th 
twice, ht, pin in 55, ht ; tw 3d and 4th twice, ht, pin in 56, ht; 
repeat edge, pin in 57. Beginning on spider, tw 6th and 7th 5 
times, etc, tw 5th 5 times, etc with 5th and 6th, tw 4th 5 times, 
etc with 4th and 5th, tw 3d 5 times, etc with 3d and 4th, tw 8th 
5 times, etc with 7th and 8th, etc with 6th and 7th, 5th and 6th, 
4th and 5th; tw 9th 5 times, etc with 8th and 9th, 7th and Sth, 
6th and 7th, 5th and 6th; beginning with 9th and 10th (tw 
10th 5 times), work back in same way to 6th and 7th, pin in 
58, etc; to right, etc with 7th and 8th, 8th and 9th, 9th and 
10th; beginning with 5th and 6th, work to right again in same way, 



ZIGZAG LACE. 



87 



dropping ioth; with 4th and 5th, to right, dropping 9th; with 3d 
and 4th, dropping 8th. This finishes the spider, which is always 
made in the same way. Proceeding now with other half of net 
zigzag, tw 10th 5 times, ht with 10th and nth, pin in 59, ht ; work 
to right, ht with 14th and 15th, pin in 60, ht ; to left, taking in 9th, 
work in same way, then to right, dropping 15th. Continue to work 
back and forth to pin 66, bet 
nth and 12th, on right; to 
left, ht with yth and 8th, put 
aside. 

On edge, tw 3d 5 times, 2d 
twice, etc; tw 1st 3 times, 2d 
twice, etc, pin in 67, etc; tw 
3d twice, 4th 5 times, etc, pin 
in 68, etc; repeat edge from 
* to *, putting pin in 69 ; tw 
4th twice, 5 th 5 times, ht, pin 
in 70, ht ; tw 3d and 4th 
twice, ht, pin in 71, ht ; re- 
peat edge, pin in 72 ; tw 5th 
twice, 6th 5 times, ht, pin in 
73, ht; tw 4th and 5th twice, 
ht, pin in 74, ht, tw 3d and 
4th twice, ht, pin in 75, ht; 
repeat edge, pin in 76. 

Tw 6th twice, 7th once, ht, 
pin in 77, ht ; to right, ht with 
10th and nth, pin in 78, ht ; 
to left as before, taking in 5 th, 
pin in 79 ; then to right, 
dropping nth, pin in 80; 
work back and forth, put- 




ting pin in 8^, bet 3d and 



Zig-zag Lace. 



4th, then to right, ht with 

7th and 8th, put aside. This finishes the net zigzag. 

To complete open-hole zigzag, tw 16th 3 times, 17th twice, ht, 



88 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

pin in 84, ht ; same with 15th and 16th, pin in 85, ht ; continue to 
9th and 10th, with pin in 91. On other side, tw 17th and 18th 
twice, ht, pin in 92, ht ; work in same way to 10th and nth, pin in 
99. 

For remainder of net ground in scallop, tw 20th 3 times, 21st 
once, ht, pin in 100, ht; to right, ht with 25 th and 26th, pin in 101, 
ht; to left, taking in 19th, work as before, then work to right, and 
continue back and forth to 14th and 15th, pin in 112, ht; to right, 
pin in 113, and back .to 13th and 14th, ht, and pin in 1 again. 

This completes the design, which is a very useful one for many 
purposes. 



LAMBREQUIN. 

[Contributed by M. E. Love, Rome, Wis.] 

Materials : Barbour's flax macram£, 5-cord, No. 16, and Barbour's 
patent macram£-desk. 

Cut threads 36 inches long, double, and knot on the horizontal 
thread used as leading-bar. (See directions for macrame work, 
page 67, No. 3.) Make a row of Solomon's knots, which are formed 
by taking 4 threads, hold 2 centre ones straight, pass left thread 
over these, pass right thread over this, under centre ones, and up 
through loop at left side ; repeat with right thread, draw tight. 
Wind each thread over a second horizontal thread, make 2 rows of 
knots, wind threads twice over third bar ; 5 rows knots, then twice 
over 4th bar. Take 8 threads, wind each twice around 1st thread 
at left, held slanting, use last thread wound to carry back, winding 
each thread around twice and loop through 1st space at top; carry 
last thread back same way. Slant next thread opposite way, carry- 
ing to left, wind to right and left as before, and repeat. Wind each 
thread twice over 5th bar; make 2 rows of knots. With 2d knot 
make single chain (made by knotting each alternately) of left and 
right pairs, tying 8 times ; tie with Solomon's knot. Braid outside 
4 threads to make curve, wind 2 of the threads around all twice, and 
tie at back. The 1st knot will only have 2 threads, but that may be 
made in single chain ; all others will have 4. Cut ends evenly. 



LAMBREQUIN 



89 



I am glad to see that knotted work is again coming into favor. It 
is useful in many ways, and very beautiful made with the Irish flax 




Lambrequin. 



threads. By the aid of the macrame lace-desk, too, any one can 
easily learn to do it nicely, and it affords a large scope for house- 
hold decoration. 



90 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



• ULSTER FRINGE. 

Materials : Ulster rope linen floss, shades 7 1 and 80, or any color 
or colors desired. 

Barbour's patent macrame desk is very nice for making this and 
other fringe. On a leading bar, knot 4 threads of each, alternating 
colors. Double a length of floss, stretch across, then cross the 
knotted threads, weaving under and over the bar, alternately. 




Ulster Fringe. 



Double a length of the color of floss not previously doubled, weave 
the knotted threads under and over this, and finish with a single 
Solomon's knot. 



ULSTER FRINGE. 91 

Ladies have little idea of what a simple matter it is to make this 
popular trimming for scarfs, table-covers, etc., or of how fascinating 
a study it is. Almost any design may be originated or copied, and 
the shades of the floss used in the embroidery exactly matched, 
which adds largely to the effectiveness of their work. Again, little 
of the fringe on sale at the stores is of the pure flax, but is cheap 
and " cottony " looking, and grows more so rapidly with even the 
most careful usage. One would hardly think of finishing a piece of 
embroidered work upon which she had expended time and care, 
with a machine-made, cheap lace, which would detract so largely 
from the effect of her own handiwork ; why, then, should she be 
willing to use a " sale " fringe when she can so easily provide a rich, 
handsome substitute? 



DEPARTMENT 4. 



SCARF IN DANISH ANTIQUE EMBROIDERY. 

[Contributed by Mrs. Betty Petersen, 5 I. A. Schwartzgade, Kjobenhavn, Denmark.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, 3 -cord, 200-yard spools, 
white, No. 40 and No. 60, and strip of heavy linen 23/3 yards long 
and 20 inches wide. Use No. 60 for drawn- work and finer of the 
lace-stitches. For finer linen use finer thread. 

Draw threads, and make plain hemstitched hem two inches wide 
on ends and y 2 inch wide on sides. Six inches above hem make 
a row of drawn-work y 2 inch wide, and 6 inches above this another. 

Stamp or mark the design, which is a very simple one. The 
leaf figure which extends along the sides of scarf constitutes the 
greater part of the pattern. This is worked in plain satin-stitch, the 
stitches taken through and through, care being taken only that 
these are even and the work not drawn. The 3 upper segments are 
divided by a line in the centre of each, extending nearly to the top, 
the others worked over and over. A row of chain-stitching sur- 
rounds the figure in which is the open-work, all save the 3 top seg- 
ments referred to. The oval cut-work figure is surrounded by a 
double line of stitches, set aslant from centre of line outward. 
The " roses " have their scalloped petals worked around, then the 
centre circle buttonholed, the linen cut out, and a little wheel woven 
in. For the open-work, thread a needle and follow design with fine 
running stitches, cut centre carefully, not too near the run, bend 
linen back, work buttonhole stitches from left to right over the 
edges, and fill with different lace stitches. It is all so very easy that 
any lady will be able to reproduce the scarf, and cannot fail to be 
delighted with her work. It is extremely effective, being rich and 
heavy. We consider Barbour's Irish flax threads superior to all 
others for this work. 



Prize Needle-Work, Series No. 4. 




mosaic work. 



See 



That all 

your 

Linen 

Thread 

carries 

this Trade-Mark 




Prize Needle-Work, Series No. 4. 



MOSAIC WORK. 

THIS, a variety of flat embroidery, may perhaps be called a new 
version of an old story, since the "convent work" of which 
it is a revival, was very anciently used in the production of 
tapestry hangings, etc. Its antiquity does not detract from its 
popularity, however, and its adaptation to the requirements of 
modern decorative art argues strongly in its favor, 

The illustration shows a section of border which may be used 
for finishing a table scarf, book-case drapery, portiere, or whatever 
is required, choosing colors which harmonize with other furnishings. 
In the present instance, Shade Nos. 31, 32, 100, 101, 121 and 
122 were used. The material is a wiry, scrim-like canvas, and the 
floss is carried over and under, making both sides alike, and follow- 
ing the weave of the canvas. As in doing Oriental embroidery, 
and other, care should be taken not to draw the work by pulling 
the floss too tight. It is always wise to use an embroidery frame or 
hoop. 

The designing of patterns for this work is a fascinating study. 
That shown, which may be repeated to form a sofa-cushion, lounge- 
cover or table-spread, as is required, is almost entirely an arrange- 
ment of half-squares. Many of the old-fashioned "patchwork" 
patterns, now in favor again, may be utilized, and the production 
of a counterpane or " quilt" in mosaic work is not so arduous an 
undertaking as might be imagined. 

For covering upholstered chairs, foot-rests, etc., this work is 
new and very desirable. For such purposes it is best to line the 
canvas with some heavy material. A handsome chair back lately 
observed was of mosaic work, interlined with very stiff canvas, 
which was padded on both sides with wadding. It was edged with 
a heavy cord of the floss, with loops for fastening to the chair, and 
the lower edge was finished with fringe of the same. 




Scarf in Danish Antique Embroidery. 



94 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



ART-SQUARE IN BULGARIAN EMBROIDERY. 

[Contributed by Anna G. Ford, Roxbury, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Ulster rope linen floss, 8 skeins each of 
shades Nos. 51, 71, 20^, 43, 4 skeins each of Nos. 2 and 130, and 2 
skeins of No. 80, with same of shade No. 3, etching-flax, for the 




Art-Square in Bulgarian Embroidery. 



lacing in sides of bell. Have the design stamped or traced upon 
heavy unbleached linen. 



TABLE-COVER IN APPLIQUE EMBROIDERY. 95 

But little description is necessary for doing this work, which, with 
its quaint combinations of coloring and conspicuous pattern, so free 
from the conventional pettiness of prescribed rule, is rapidly growing 
in favor. Separate parts of any design may be taken, varied, and 
enlarged upon so as to produce almost equally original patterns, to 
be used for portieres, table-covers, etc. The embroidery is invari- 
ably done upon coarse linen, and the prettiest finish is a lace of 
Barbour's Irish flax thread, gray, with darned-in threads of colored 
floss. A beautiful table-scarf is formed of a strip of Bulgarian 
embroidery, edged on each side by a strip of plush of the same 
width, the ends finished with lace, as noted. 

The square, of which a corner is shown in the illustration, is 
designed for a small table, cushion-cover, or whatever use it is de- 
sired to put it to. Omitting the scalloped edge, it is a beautiful 
design for a sofa-pillow. If preferred, the edge may not be cut out, 
the finish being of heavy flax lace or knotted fringe. The scallops are 
worked in shades Nos. 5 1 and 71, alternating. Outlining is done with 
shades Nos. 20^ and 80, alternating, beginning in the corner with 
shade 43 (black). The leaves in centre of scallop are worked 
with shade No. 20J4 — the scallop being of shade 51. The first bar 
is of shade 20^, the second of shade 51, and the 3d of shade 130. 
The half-moons on the second bar are of shade No. 2, and the oval 
between them of shade No. 71, which also forms the bell. The oval 
in the bell has a figure of shade 51, with groundwork of shade 
80, the curving figures on third bar are of shade 51, the leaves in 
bell and circles above of shade 20^. Any variations of color are 
permissible, so that a pleasing effect is produced. Lovers of art- 
work will appreciate the quaint beauty of this embroidery. 



TABLE-COVER IN APPLIQUE EMBROIDERY. 

[Contributed by Mrs. A. \V. Stratton, So. Framingham, Mass.] 

Materials : 4 skeins each shades Nos. 10, 20, 42, 80, 82, 100, 120, 
and 131^ Ulster rope linen floss, and square of bronze-green 
linen, 1% yards wide. 



96 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



The tulip design shown is very simple but most effective, and 
quite an oddity. The work consists of cross-stitching and outline. 
For the leaves, use shade 10 for the cross-stitch, to do which the 




Table-Cover in Applique Embroidery. 



floss issimply carried from one side to the other, slightly slanted, a 
short stitch being taken through on the edge of leaf, which is out- 
lined, as are also the stems, with shade 20. The 1st tulip on the 



SOFA PILLOW IN PICOT EMBROIDERY. 97 

right is filled in with cross-stitching in shade 42, outlined with shade 
131^ ;that to the left of cluster of 3 is the same. The centre 
tulip of the 3 is filled in with shade 80, outlined with shade 82 ; the 
lower one, and that to the extreme left, is the same, while that on 
the right of the 3 is filled in with shade 120, outlined with shade 
100. 

Other corners of the spread may be varied as liked in combina- 
tion of shades. A very handsome table-cover, in this design, may 
be made of blue denim or linen — or any other desired color with 
which the blue shades harmonize — using for the embroidery the 
new delf shades lately added to the Ulster color-book. As suggested, 
the design is easily and rapidly executed, and a. favorite with all 
who desire effective work with the least expenditure of time and 
patience. 

When the embroidery is completed, wind a skein of shade 
131^, fasten in, and go around with a crochet chain, * ch 5, miss 
l / 2 inch, 1 sc in material, and repeat. For the tassel fringe, cut 
skeins once, draw one thread from each and place together evenly. 
Double, cut in half, again, take }£, double, push loop back through 
chain loop, draw ends through and pull up smoothly. Miss a chain 
loop, and repeat. 

No lady who has made a fringe of the real flax thread (Ulster 
floss) will again use the machine-made fringes purporting to be linen, 
but which are in reality half cotton, on sale in the stores. 



SOFA PILLOW IN PICOT EMBROIDERY. 

[Contributed by Hildegard Erixon, 321 East 119th Street, New York, N.Y.] 

Materials : Barbour's Ulster rope linen floss, size oo, 5 skeins 
shade No. 2, and 2 skeins shade No. 133, 1 skein each, same 
shades, size 8, square of fine, dark-green cloth, 18 x 18 inches, 
lining same size, and medium-size crochet hook. 

Make the braid in this way: * Ch 4, 1 dc in 1st st of ch ; re- 
peat from * to desired length. A skein of the floss makes about 
1 y± yards of braid. 



98 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

Stamp or draw the design on the cloth (if the latter is thin, first 
line it with cambric to give requisite firmness), sew on the braid 
with long, invisible stitches along the straight edge, using for this 
purpose the size 8 floss, or spool linen No. 80, if preferred. Follow 




Sofa-Pillow in Picot Embroidery. 



the design closely. When done, fasten down the picots with an in- 
visible stitch in the point of each. A twisted cord of the two colors 
of floss may be made for the edge, or a cord crocheted as described 
on page 55, in Book No. 3, using the two colors alternately. 

This work is very easy to do, rapidly done, and extremely 
effective. Of course, any colors of floss may be chosen, and of cloth 
as well. It is applicable to any material, for table-scarfs, piano- 
covers, etc., etc., open, graceful designs being preferred. Allow me 



Prize Needle-Work, Series No. 4. 







ORIENTAL EMBROIDERY. 



Prize Needle- Work, Series No. 4. 
ORIENTAL EMBROIDERY. 

THIS style of work is something entirely new, but will be 
brought out by several teachers in Art Needle-work schools 
during the coming fall and winter, and promises to be 
extremely popular. It is rapidly and easily done, and, by the 
use of Ulster Rope Linen, has a richness of effect that will win 
for it the admiration of ladies everywhere, especially those who 
delight in the production of artistic work with the least expen- 
diture of time and labor. Its applications seem almost limitless. 
As a decoration for table scarfs and covers, lambrequins, sofa- 
pillows, chair-backs, etc., it will be found most effective. Colors 
may be chosen in accordance with the taste of the worker — the 
seventy-five or eighty shades produced in the Ulster Floss offer 
a wide field for choice — it being remembered that the aim is to 
attain the colorings presented by Oriental fabrics which, while 
brilliant, are soft, rich, harmonious. 

The design chosen for illustration in color is one which for 
attractiveness and simplicity of outline can scarcely be surpassed. 
The material on which it is worked is a heavy cream-color 
linen. Shade Nos. i, 10, 30, 32, 100, 101, no, 120 and 122 
of the Barbour's Ulster Floss were chosen for the work, and the 
manner of combining them is plainly shown, the design being 
first marked or stamped. The outline thread (shade 3) is couched 
on, using Ulster Etching Flax of the same shade for the purpose. 
If preferred, gold thread may be used for this outline, giving, 
perhaps, more of the Oriental effect. There are but two forms 
of stitch used beside the common outline-stitch. Take the upper 
point of the fleur-de-lis, for one example : the threads are carried 
the entire length of leaf, up and down, all on one side, merely 
taking a stitch through the linen between. Work across these, 
at equal distances, taking a stitch through the linen, to hold the 
under threads in place. This work is all on the right side, and 
constitutes the greater part of that shown. The scrolls (shade 
10 1) are worked over and under, following a straight thread 
across. In fact, the beauty of this work depends much on keeping 
the applied threads in line with the woven ones of the material. 



CROSS-STITCH DESIGN. 



99 



to add that Barbour's Ulster floss is far superior to silk for all work of 
this kind, as the silk grows fuzzy and rough with little use, while the 
floss remains smooth and lustrous. 



CROSS-STITCH DESIGN. 

[Contributed by Ella H. Stratton, Holliston, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Ulster white flossette, size *, sewing-needle 
large enough to carry thread nicely. 

This design is pretty for many purposes ; may be used as a trim- 
ming for aprons, children's dresses, etc., or be worked in color 
on a square of scrim for cushion-cover, tidy, or what is liked, as it 
may be readily enlarged or made smaller at pleasure. Miss a row 




1' I I'-i 2 2 2 12 2 2 12 2 !! vi! 



I i : | ■!'■'! II i' I | | | | | Iff | I I | I | | | 

'"2 i""l i"i I" I I "I I I I 'I I i I I I I I I I I I I I 

'i 1 1 r 1 1 ■•" 1 1 1 i i ii i i ■■ i 1 1 1 1 1 § i ■ ■ 

-■'■i 1 1" i i i -i | i i i 1 1 i i !• i r i 1 1 1 1 1 ' 

1 1 1 1 1 i" i -ii 'i' :: r 1 1- § § i i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' 

j :•' 1 1- •!• -i"' 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1' r § f 1 1 1 

I -I' S 111 '!- 3 |!| i -I I' I"-! I | I I | |'i ; i' I 

III I I II I 

'111 1 SIS 5 





Cross-Stitch Design. 

or two of checks between stars. If desired, the spool thread may 
be used, as it is so lustrous and smooth that the effect is excellent. 



100 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



INLAID WORK. 

[Contributed by Miss Ruby Boyd, 300 So. Esplanade, Leavenworth, Kan.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, ecru, No. 80, 3-cord, 200- 
yards spools, 1 spool No. 250, 2 -cord, 200-yards spools, French 
nainsook, and Brussels net. 



A, 







BARBOURS PRIZE NEEDLE WORK SERIES. BOOK NO 



Inlaid Work, 



If making trimming for ruffling, tear off widths of the nainsook 
and join until of length required. Allow for hem, but do not baste 
or stitch. Mark on wrong side spaces or checks y& inch square, 
then with a sharp pair of embroidery scissors cut from centre of 
each square nearly to the sides. Take a strip of net the length of 
trimming required, and a little wider than design, baste at each edge 



INLAID WORK. 101 

securely on wrong side, then from the right side turn in the cut 
points on wrong side, forming an open diamond, in which the net 
shows. It is a very simple thing to do. If desired these points 
may be folded back and pressed neatly in place with a hot iron 
before basting on the net. With sewing-machine (chain-stitch, if 
possible) stitch closely to the edge of diamonds, diagonally across 
design, then turn hem over lower raw edge of net and stitch, a row 
of stitching completing the top, also. 

The stars are worked in centre of each square with No. 80, the 
flax thread having a beautiful silky appearance, and washing without 
detracting from this. The pattern may be made wider by repeating. 
It is a beautiful finish for dresses, aprons, yokes, etc., also for trim- 
ming underwear. In fancy work its applications are unlimited. A 
sofa- pillow of red and black was recently observed, laid off in 
" checkerboard " fashion. For this, do the stitching with Barbour's 
Irish flax thread, black, No. 50, 200-yards spools, and work stars 
red on black and black on red, or yellow on both, with Ulster rope 
linen floss, size 00. The work is dainty, durable, and not at all 
difficult. 



DEPARTMENT 5. 



DESIGNS FOR DOILIES. 

[Contributed by Ella H. Stratton, Holliston, Mass.] 

1 . Shamrock pattern ; outline and buttonhole-stitch, or long and 
short stitch, and cut-work. Or this design may be used in braid- 
work. 

2. Outline or cut-work scroll with hemstitched border. 

3. Pansy design, with border in long and short stitch, or solid 
embroidery ; very effective in natural colors. 

4. Cut-work ; lines buttonhole-stitched, and spaces filled with 
lace-stitches, behind which the linen is cut away. 

5. " Good Luck" pattern; four-leaf clover, with edge in button- 
hole or long and short stitch, clover-leaves in embroidery. 



DOILY. 

[Contributed by Alice S. Luka, Van Deusen, Mass.] 

Materials : A skein Ulster etching flax, size 4, shade 3, 1 spool 
each No. 70 and No. 100 Barbour's Irish flax thread, 3-cord, 200- 
yards spools, J^ yard satin jean, and 2 yards looped rick-rack braid. 

Cut a square of the jean in 3 scallops, stamp or mark a tiny pat- 
tern in each scallop, and outline with the Ulster etching flax. Hem 
the doily neatly, using No. 100, and cover the hem with a feather- 
stitching, using the etching flax for this purpose. Sew the braid 
around the doily, catching by each point. 

For the edge : 

1. Dc in loop, ch 3, 2 dtc in same loop, keeping 3 sts on needle 
and working off together, miss a loop of braid, 2 dtc in next, ch 3, 




BARBOUR5 PRIZE NEEDLE WORK SERIES. BOCK MH. 



Designs for Doilies. 



104 



barbour's prize needle-work series. 



dc in same place, working the 2 dtc and ch off together as before, 
repeat from 1st of row all around. 

2. Dc between 2 dtc, ch 3 and 2 dtc in same sp, 3 ch, 2 dtc in 
same place, * 2 dtc, 3 ch and dc in next sp, 3 ch, 2 dtc in same sp> 
repeat from * once, fasten off, leave a sp, and start in next sp as at 
beginning of the round. 

3. Dc in sp, 3 ch, 2 dtc in same sp, 2 dtc, 3 ch, dc in next sp, 
3 ch, 2 dtc in same sp, 2 dtc, 3 ch, dc in next sp, fasten off. 




Doily. 



4. Dc in sp, 3 ch, 2 dtc in same sp, 2 dtc, 3 ch, 1 dc in next sp, 
fasten off. This finishes 1 point of edging. Repeat from 2d round. 



Prize Needle- Work, Series No. 4. 




See that all your 
Liken Thread carries 

This Trade Mark. 



POPPY DESIGN. 



Prize Needle-Work, Series No. 4. 



POPPY DESIGN. 

EMBROIDERIES in flax thread are absorbing more and more 
the attention of European needle-women as well as those of 
our own country, and this is quite as it should be. The 
Ulster rope linen floss and etching flax is now made in every 
desirable shade, and color novelties are constantly added as proved 
useful to the needle artist. We may mention one essential of em- 
broidery thread which is a peculiar property of flax. It does not 
roughen with use, but remains lustrous and smooth. The poppy is 
much in favor with needle-workers, its large, single petals rendering 
it well adapted to the capabilities of the average embroiderer, while 
it is difficult to conceive a more effective design in natural flowers. 
Our illustration presents a charming model, and is from the original. 
Detail of stitches is unnecessary, as they are so plainly shown. 

Shade Nos. 2, 20, 43, 44 and 122. Barbour's Ulster Rope 
Linen Floss were used in the production, which was designed orig- 
inally for a scarf, of fine black linen scrim. It may, however, be 
most appropriately used on a sofa pillow, of linen bedspread, now 
so much in favor. A spread of rich ecru or "corn-flower blue" 
linen, having clusters of these flowers scattered over the surface, 
intermingled with single blossoms and petals, has a richness of 
effect scarcely to be imagined. It should be finished with a heavy 
lace of Barbour's Irish flax thread, ecru, either crocheted, netted, 
bobbined or knitted, with threads of the color used in the flower 
decoration darned in, simply following a portion of the design. 
A scarf to cover the pillows may be made to match the spread. 

The hints given are suggestive, merely, and will be enlarged 
upon and elaborated by lovers of the beautiful in embroidery. 



MAPLE-LEAF DOILY. 



105 



MAPLE-LEAF DOILY. 

[Contributed by Mrs. E. M. Love, Rome, Wis.] 

Materials : Barbour's Ulster rope linen floss, size oo, shades i, 
^y 2i and ii ? needle large enough to let the thread slip easily, and 
piece of linen 10 inches square. 




Maple-Leaf Doily. 

Take for pattern the natural maple leaf, choosing one as perfect 
as possible. Mark the outlines upon the linen lightly. Outline with 
buttonhole-stitch, or "long and short" stitch, using shade 4^, 
outside this, on edge, close buttonhoie-stitch with shade 11, and 
inside work common satin stitch between long and short stitches 
with shade 1. Vein the leaves with outline or Kensington stitch, 
using shade 4^ . Cut out the linen shape of leaf, and press on 



loe 



barbour's prize needle-work: series. 



wrong side, with slightly dampened cloth over it. If preferred, 
other colors may be chosen, or the embroidery done with Ulster 
white nossette, size ***. These leaves, applied to light-green 
denim, make a lovely finish for table- scarf. Indeed, the idea may 
be utilized in many beautiful articles of home decoration. 



TRAY-CLOTH IN DOUBLE OUTLINE. 

[Contributed by Edna D. Stoddard, Washburn, Me.] 

Materials : Six skeins Ulster etching flax, size 4, shade 30, a 
spool of Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 150, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, piece of linen 21X30 inches. 




Tray-Cloth in Double Outline. 

Draw threads 3 inches from edge, and make a plain hem, using 
the No. 150 thread, and taking up 4 threads with each stitch. 

Mark a design of grape leaves, using a small natural leaf to draw 
from if you have no pattern. To make the double outline, or chain- 



CENTRE-PIECE IN HONIf ON AND HALF-KENSINGTON. 107 

stitch, make a knot in the end of floss, draw your needle through 
work, hold the floss down with left thumb, and take a short stitch 
ahead in a straight line. For next stitch, hold floss as before, and 
put needle down through lower part or end of last stitch, bringing 
it up to make a stitch of same length, and draw up. This is a 
change from the ordinary outlining. 

Use any shades of etching flax desired. Pure white (flossette, 
size *) is very pretty, or cream, or ecru — shades 41 or 42. 



CENTRE-PIECE IN HONITON AND HALF- 
KENSINGTON. 

[Contributed by Miss Elise Jungbluth, Beaufort, S.C.] 

Materials : Barbour's Ulster etching flax, size 4, 1 skein each of 
shades Nos. 1, 3, no, and 112, with a skein of No. 40 (white) for 
buttonholing, a 14-inch square of fine linen, and 2 sizes of braid, 8 
medallions of each. 

Mark out a circle lightly and carefully, having the edge in scal- 
lops, with 8 medallion ovals for the larger braid. Baste the braid 
on carefully, and buttonhole to the cloth, catching only a thread of 
the braid at each stitch, and letting the top of the buttonholing be 
on the edge of the braid. The smaller medallions are basted on 
horizontally, coming on a circle half-way between the outer or up- 
right medallions ; of these the outer edge of each medallion scallop 
is buttonholed, from outside toward medallion, beginning at the 
bottom and working entirely around, after which the edge between 
the medallions around the entire mat. All the buttonholing is done 
by making a short, then a long stitch, which gives a very pretty 
finish. 

Embroider the roses in half-Kensington, the two upper petals 
toward centre of mat in shade 112, other three with shade no, 
centres satin-stitched with shade 1, and French knots of shade 3. 

When completed cut away the linen carefully under each medal- 
lion, being sure not to cut too near the edge. 

This design, while not so elaborate as to be tedious in the work- 



108 barbour's prize needle-work series. 




Centre-Piece in Honiton and Half-Kensington. 

ing, is very effective. The idea is suggestive, and may be carried 
out in larger pieces of work, using heavier linen, if desired, with the 
Ulster etching flax, which comes in the most beautiful shades imag- 
inable, and is unequalled for outlining or solid embroidery. 



CUT-WORK DESIGN FOR SCARF END. 

[Contributed by Mrs. H. Muller, 44 W. 64th Street, New York, N.Y.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax macrame, 9-cord, white, Ulster 
etching flax, shade 53, and linen of width and length desired for 
scarf. 



CUT-WORK DESIGN FOR SCARF END. 



109 



Mark the design, which is very simple, although showy. Carry 
the cord along the lines, couching it on with the etching flax. 
Then in the centre of the star make a little wheel as so often 
described in these pages, and with sharp scissors cut away the linen 
carefully. Designs of any kind may be used. The method is very 




Cut-Work Design for Scarf End. 



effective. If preferred, colored linen or denim may be chosen, 
with a shade of etching flax to harmonize with it. The Ulster floss 
is superior to other materials for the purpose. 



110 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES, 



CLOVER SOFA PILLOW. 

[Contributed by Elise Jungbluth, Beaufort, S.C.] 

Materials : Barbour's Ulster rope linen floss, size oo, 5 skeins of 
No. 20, 3 each of Nos. no and 30, 2 each of Nos. in, 112, 21, and 
21^2, and 1 each of 121 and 61, and 24 inches double-width art 
denim, green or any desired color. 

Outline scrolls with shade 21, stems of clover and leaves with 
2 1 J^. Leaves are worked in long and short stitch with 20, veins of 







Clover Sofa Pillow. 



leaves outlined with shade 30. Clover flowers are worked in five 
shades. The stitch is a little peculiar, resembling the letter V 



CLOVER SOFA PILLOW. Ill 

inverted, with a line downward from centre point — this middle 
stitch being made last. The 2 stitches which form the inverted V 
meet at the top. It is very simple, and gives the clover a most 
natural appearance. The first 2 or 3 rows (beginning at the top) 
are made with the lightest shade, no, next 2 with in, being 
careful to work the stitches closely up into the irregular spaces 
between the stitches of 1st shade. Nearer the bottom of flower use 
shade 112, then shade 121, and the bottom a few stitches of shade 
61. The tiny leaves at bottom of clover are worked with shade 30 
in long and short stitch. 

This design is very handsome when properly worked, and may be 
applied to table-covers, lambrequins, portieres, or what you will. It 
is original, and the work of an artist. The engraving can show little 
of its beauty as brought out by the rich colorings of the Ulster floss. 

A handsome cord to match this pillow, or for any purpose, may 
be easily made by the use of a simple little device called a " cord- 
maker," or by attaching an end of " wicking " to a small pencil, and 
crocheting around this with the Ulster floss of shade desired. 



DEPARTMENT 6. 



CENTRE SQUARE. 

Materials: Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 50 and No. 150, 
3-cord, 200-yards spools, )/± inch square fine linen, and 15 yards 
new Ulster braid. 



Centre Square. 



CENTRE-PIECE IN OLD ENGLISH POINT. 113 

Draw threads in square 2 inches from edge, and make plain 
hemstitched hem, using No. 150 for this purpose. Baste the braid 
upon pattern, of which one corner or side is shown. The curves are 
made by running the needle through the picot loops, drawing thread 
until the requisite shape is attained. The braids are connected by 
twisted threads, as shown, or by means of any desired stitches. 
The large space in centre of side may be filled by a woven fan- 
wheel, if preferred, and this method is quite as pretty. None but 
the most simple and rapidly made stitches are employed in this de- 
sign, but it is not possible to convey either by work or engraving a 
correct idea of the rich effect produced by the use of this braid. 
It is the latest and most artistic production of the loom, and woven 
of pure Irish flax. The cording gives work done with it a peculiar 
richness of appearance, like embossing or figures in relief, differing 
entirely from the ordinary flat braid-work. It may be used in any 
design, resembling the most rich and heavy embroidery with little 
work, but its especial province seems to lie in the production of 
large pieces — such as bed-spreads, draperies, etc., which one 
hesitates to undertake with the ordinary braids, the process of com- 
pletion is so toilsome. With the Ulster braid the work is rapidly 
done and the result a marvel of beauty. 



CENTRE-PIECE IN OLD ENGLISH POINT. 

[Contributed by Anna S. Converse, So. Worthington, Mass.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, 3-cord, 200-yards spools, 
1 spool each No. 120 and No. 150, and 2 spools each No. 30 and 
No. 50, 2 dozen yards plain linen hemstitch braid, 3/g inch wide, 
piece of plain linen for centre, 10 inches in diameter, sewing-needle 
large enough to carry thread without fraying, and fine crochet -hook. 
The new Ulster braid will be especially effective for this. 

The piece shown illustrates a beautiful design in this work, 
adapted for table and furniture decoration, and will be found 
effective used as a centre-piece or cover for a small tea-table. The 
arrangement of both design and stitches is original. The design 
should first be placed over stiff wrapping-paper to keep the work 



114 



harbour's prize needle-work series. 



smooth while in progress. The braid is then firmly basted on the 
design, and all curves whipped with the No. 120 thread to bring 
them to the desired outline. All ends should be neatly fastened on 
the upper side, as the worker must bear in mind that the work is 




Centre-Piece in Old English Point. 

wrong side up while in progress. For the ground-work, also the 
filling of all figures, the No. 30 thread is used in a variety of stitches. 
One need not be confined to the use of any particular stitches, 
choosing those which are effective and serve the purpose desired. 
This illustration shows the following stitches : 

Plain cross-stitch for the petals of each rose ; in the leaflets of the 



CENTRE-PIECE IN OLD ENGLISH POINT. 115 

leaf, beginning on the upper side of petals, for No. i " Sorrento " 
bars and wheels, formed by passing the thread through length of 
space, twisting back on the thread twice ; carry the thread across 
each way and twist back to centre, then work under and over the 
bars forming the wheels ; repeat through space. For leaflet No. 2 
plain cross-stitch. For No. 3, or odd leaflet, " point d'Anvers " 
bars, made by passing four threads through length of space, two on 
either side of point ; beginning at the apex, weave under and over 
double threads, a close bar at short distances carrying the thread to 
the margin of braid. For leaflet No. 4 work " point de Bruxelles " 
(plain buttonhole) stitches along one side of braid, then on the 
other side make one " point de Bruxelles " stitch on braid with a 
long " point de Bruxelles " stitch in Bruxelles stitch on opposite 
side, also a close Bruxelles stitch in next stitch on same side, and 
fill the long stitch of previous row with close Bruxelles stitches ; 
repeat. Plain cross-stitch for leaflet No. 5. For the buttons use 
No. 50 thread. These are made by winding thread ten times for 
the two larger sizes, and eight times for the smallest size, round 
a tiny pencil or stick, varying the size of same for the different 
sizes of buttons, crocheting over the threads with short crochet-stitch 
till the space is filled in full. The buttons are then grouped in 
clusters as may be seen in illustration, the cord attached for stem 
and basted wrong side up on design. The small rings scattered 
here and there are made by winding thread ten times round a tiny 
cork, and working close Bruxelles stitches over them. These are 
then basted down wrong side up, either singly or in groups of 
threes. Then all parts of the work are connected by " Raleigh " 
bars with picots, which are formed by passing thread three times 
from point to point, and working over them close Bruxelles stitches ; 
the picots are made by passing the needle-point through stitch on 
bar, wind thread on needle ten times, press thumb tightly on this, 
and draw the needle and thread through the twists. After remov- 
ing the work from the design the centres of roses are finished on 
the right side with raised rings, formed by winding thread twenty- 
five times round a cork, nearly the size of the space, then covering 
with close Bruxelles stitches • the ring is then turned the other side 



116 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

up on the cork and the centre filled ; same with back-stitch wheels 
formed by first making one row of loose Bruxelles stitches round 
ring, then pick up these stitches on a thread drawn close to form 
an inner circle, and fasten ; pass the thread four times across the 
circle at equal distances, twisting back to centre each time, then 
work the wheel by taking a back-stitch round each strand, going 
round and round till the size required ; some rings are filled with a 
Maltese cross, which is made by passing threads across the ring six 
times, each time twisting back to centre, in four groups ; then be- 
ginning at centre weave under and over the three strands of each 
group till nearly full, as may be seen in illustration. Other rings 
are filled with " point de Bruxelles " and " point de Venice " 
stitches in alternate rows.. Make from right to left one row of 
Bruxelles stitches, then work back one loose Bruxelles stitch, in 
which are worked three Bruxelles stitches closely drawn up ; repeat. 
The work is then placed over the linen and side-stitched down on 
the upper side, the linen cut evenly on the under side, the edges 
turned in and side-stitched down on the braid, using the No. 150 
thread for this purpose. The work should then be pinned down on 
a sheet and pressed with hot iron over damp cloths, which adds 
much to the beauty of the work. 



CENTRE-PIECE IN NEEDLE HONITON. 

[Contributed by Mrs. L. A. Thompson, Highlands, Col.] 

Materials, Sj/3 yards large-size honiton braid (No. 448), yi yard 
same size, but different pattern (No. 446), for pansies in the corners, 
2 yards 2d size (No. 410), 3 yards braid for edge (No. 34.6), and 
2 spools Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 120. Any patterns of 
braid that are liked may be chosen ; the numbers given are those 
used in the design shown. 

Begin by firmly basting the braid on both edges to the pattern, 
as one basting through the middle will not be sufficient. The flower 
designs are fastened together before being basted on. Baste all 
wrong side up, as the upper side is always the wrong side of lace. 



CENTRE-PIECE IN NEEDLE HONITON. 



117 



In this design, which is original, a large variety of stitches may be 
used. The groundwork around the flower designs is composed of 
Raleigh bars, which are formed by passing the thread across 3 times 
and working over them a closely drawn buttonhole- stitch. The two 
spaces in the corner are filled by making 5 twisted bars across the 




Centre-piece in Needle Honiton. 



space, then 5 bars across those already made, at each intersection 
making a small "spider-web." The spaces on each side of these 
are filled with " Point de Venise." First work a row of loose 
buttonhole-stitches from right to left, turn, make 1 loose button- 
hole-stitch, in this stitch work 2 buttonhole-stitches tightly drawn 
up, then a loose buttonhole-stitch, and repeal to end of row. Make 
every other row plain. Next is the spider-web stitch, or wheel, 



118 barbour's prize needle-work series. 

which should be made large, to produce which bars are twisted 
across the space (12 in all) and the web woven in the centre. But 
perhaps the prettiest is what I shall call " weaving-stitch." Make 
28 single threads across the space. Fasten your thread, which 
should be quite long, in the centre, and make 2 buttonhole- stitches, 
dividing the threads into groups of 7 each. Begin now to weave 
the thread around one of the groups. Having woven across 12 or 
15 times, drop 1 thread on either end and continue weaving 
around 5 threads for 10 or 12 times, then drop a thread on either 
end and weave around the 3 remaining threads. Having woven 
across 10 or 12 times, pass the needle through the middle to the 
centre, and begin the opposite portion of stitch. The edge used in 
this piece is not picot, and launders beautifully. The centre should 
be of fine linen, carefully felled in. Lined with some dainty color 
and placed beneath a bowl of roses this piece makes an exquisite 
table ornament. 



PLATE DOILY IN OLD ENGLISH POINT. 

[Contributed by Anna S. Converse, So. Worthington, Mass.] 

Materials : A spool each No. 35 and No. 100 Barbour's Irish flax 
thread, 3 -cord, 200-yards spools, 7 yards linen hemstitch braid % 
inch wide and 2 yards of a narrower size, with sewing-needles large 
enough to carry threads nicely. 

General directions for preparing the design are given for centre- 
piece, the No. 100 thread being used for whipping the braid in 
place. For all stitches use No. 35, filling the bow-knots with point de 
Bruxelles and point de Venise in alternate rows. (First, buttonhole- 
stitch from right to left, then work back a loose buttonhole-stitch, in 
which work 3 buttonhole stitches closely drawn up \ repeat.) The tiny 
leaves are filled with the plain cross-stitch. The groundwork con- 
necting all braids is composed of Raleigh bars and picots, the bars 
formed by passing thread 3 times from point to point and working 
over them in plain buttonhole-stitch, closely drawn, the picots by 
passing needle-point through stitch on bar, winding thread around 
needle 10 times, pressing thumb closely on this, and drawing needle 



PLATE DOILY IN OLD ENGLISH POINT. 



119 



and thread through the twists. The work is then removed from 
design and transferred to the linen centre, side-stitching the braid 




Plate Doilv in Old English Point. 



to this on right side, then cutting linen away and hemming edge 
down on wrong side. The work is then pinned down and pressed 
under damp cloths with hot iron. This is a simple but very pretty 
doily, and I like best to give the old-fashioned name, rather than the 
newer one of " Battenburg lace." 



120 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



COLLAR IN PRINCESS LACE. 

[C r.iributed by Lillian E. Converse. So. Woithington, Mass.] 

Materials: One spool Barbour's Irish flax lace thread. No. 2^0. 
2 -cord. 200-yards spools. 7 yards honiton leaf-braid. 14 yards plain 
point lace braid. 3 yards pearl edge braid, and fine sewing-needle. 




Collar in Princess Lace. 



This collar is an exquisite specimen of the u Princess " lace, 
which results from combining honiton and point lace braids in one 
design. Both design and arrangement of stitches are original. 



COLLAR IN PRINCESS LACE. 121 

The design is first stiffened by placing wrapping-paper under- 
neath it. The braids are then basted closely upon the design ; the 
curves whipped to bring them into proper outline ; the braids 
sewed neatly together on the upper side (bearing in mind that 
this is the wrong side of the work), and the ends securely fastened, 
especially where the leaf braid is cut apart. The outer plain braid 
is connected with the leaf braid by " Sorrento " or twisted bars. 
The squares formed by the leaf braid are filled with " Sorrento " 
bars and wheels made by weaving under and over the bars. 

The leaves of the sprays, and the oblong centre petals of the 
roses, are filled with plain cross-stitch. Of the outer row of petals 
in roses, the tiny petal near the peduncle is filled with " Sorrento " 
bars and wheel. The petal following, or No. 2, is filled with double 
" point de Bruxelles " or plain buttonhole stitches, two in each 
stitch. Petal No. 3 is filled by working from right to left a row of 
" point de Bruxelles " stitches, then from left to right work three close 
Bruxelles stitches in the last stitch of the preceding row, and tie 
with one Bruxelles stitch taken from the back ; repeat through the 
row ; these two rows use in alternation till the space is filled. 
Petal No. 4 is filled with plain " point de Bruxelles " stitches. 
Petal No. 5 is filled with alternate rows of " point de Bruxelles " 
and " point de Venise " stitches. First work a row of Bruxelles 
stitches from right to left, then work back a loose Bruxelles stitch 
in which work three close Bruxelles stitches and repeat. The 
heart of each rose is filled with a back-stitch wheel. " Raleigh " 
bars with picots form all the other connecting links throughout the 
collar. These are made by passing thread three times from point 
to point, and working over them close Bruxelles stitches ; the picots 
are formed by passing needle-point through stitch on bar, wind 
thread around needie ten times, press thumb tightly on this and draw 
the needle and thread through the twists. The pearl braid is over- 
handed on the outer line of entire collar, which gives it a dainty fin- 
ish. The work is now removed from design, and pressed with a hot 
iron over damp cloth. 



122 



BARBOUR S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 



HANDKERCHIEF IN IRISH POINT LACE. 

[Contributed by Miss Jessie D. Roedel, No. 441 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa.] 

Materials: One spool Barbour's Irish flax lace-thread, No. 250, 
2-cord, 200-yards spools, fine sewing-needle, 15 yards plain lace- 
braid, 1 yard small honiton, and 5^ -inch square of linen lawn. 




Handkerchief in Irish Point Lace. 



Sew the braid on design very carefully, taking only 1 picot for a 
stitch, folding over where it is needed in hemming corners and 
leaves; when it is put on around outside of pattern, take thread 
used for work, take up every picot, and draw the braid flat and firm. 



HANDKERCHIEF IN IRISH POINT LACE. 123 

It is difficult to give exact directions for lace-work of this kind, 
and really unnecessary, as the stitches may be varied indefinitely, 
according to the taste and discretion of the worker. Brussels net, 
or " point de Bruxelles," with which the petals of one rose are filled, 
is a loose buttonhole-stitch, worked from right to left until the space 
is filled. Then we have No. 2, a loose buttonhole-stitch with a 
tight stitch on the first ; No. 3, the same, with 3 buttonhole- 
stitches, slanting them to the right ; No. 4, 1 row of Brussels net, 
beginning at the right, then a row of No. 3, then a row of Brussels 
net, then stretch the thread 3 or 4 times across, and buttonhole the 
loose stitches, 2 in each one, on to the straight threads, stretch them 
again, and take up every stitch, repeating until space is filled ; No. 5, 
work from right to left, twist the stitch, placing the needle over and 
under, stretch the threads across, and buttonhole over same as 
above, placing the twisted threads about as far apart as in Brussels 
net ; No. 6, make a row of Brussels net, put 3 twisted stitches in 
each, and work on 2 rows of threads stretched across ; No. 7, a 
row of Brussels net, then 4 tight buttonhole-stitches in every other 
stitch ; No. 8, like No. 7, then, between every 4 stitches, make a 
loose stitch for the next row of 4 tight ones ; No. 9, a row of the 
net, not quite so close, into each put 5 stitches a little looser than 
previously, next row 4, and so on until there is only the long stitch 
for the five, again; No. 10, a row of the net, next row, 4 in every 
other stitch, next row 3, next row, 4 into the loose stitches, then 3, 
again, and so on; No 11, close buttonhole-stitch for 3 rows, in 
3d count stitches across, and, when you get to middle of 4th, skip 1, 
then work in close stitch to end, returning skip last stitch before 
loose one, in which work 4 tight stitches, skip 1, and so on until 
there are 4 or 5 open places, as the space will admit diagonally on 
each side, close the diamond by putting 2 close stitches in first and 
last open, until open stitches are all closed, same as shown in corner- 
tulips of handkerchief; No. 12, carry threads diagonally across and 
back again, fastening down centre with 2 or 3 buttonhole-stitches as 
the row gets wider, and weaving around centres to form tiny wheels ; 
No. 13, as in leaves, are the twisted stitches, stretch thread straight 
3 times through leaf, twist thread around these 4 or 5 times accord- 



124 barbour's prize needle-work sertes. 

ing to size of leaf, then twist thread at first on one side, then on 
other, fastening with a tight buttonhole-stitch each time, and a plain 
stitch under the stem to get thread on other side. For filling up 
the design between figures and flowers, use the Brussels net with i 
knot, the thread taken across a corner first, if there is one, and 
always making 3 stitches so there will be a middle one to catch. 

After becoming familiar with the stitches as described, which are 
very simple, they may be applied as desired. I learned this lace- 
making many years ago, and have practised it for thirty years, and 
I consider Barbour's Irish flax lace-thread superior to all others. 
The design of this handkerchief is my own, and I was awarded a 
medal and diploma for it at the Columbian Fair. 



DOILIES IN DRAWN- WORK. 

[Contributed by Miss Lena Thatcher, Frankfort, N.J.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 100, 3-cord, 200-yards 
spools, and fine, round thread linen. 

The doilies are 8*4 inches square. Draw a few threads all 
around 1 %■ inches from the edge, and hem-stitch it for the fringe ; 
y^ inch from this draw out 1 thread all around each doily, making 
the starting point for the drawn- work. Measure off a 2 -inch square 
in centre of each, drawing t thread to mark the dimensions ; this 
square is to be left plain, and the space between the 2 threads filled 
with drawn-work, of a different pattern in each doily. Two designs 
are shown. No. 1 is rather novel, and very lace-like in appearance, 
but though much admired is very simple. The strands are joined 
into groups of 2, with four threads : 1st thread across is started % 
inch from lower edge of row, and knotted around 1st group, next 
knot 2d group y 2 inch above lower edge, 3d group, y inch, 4th 
group, y 2 inch, and so on through the row; 2d thread, start on 1st 
group y 2 inch above, go down on 2d group % inch, up on 3d group 
y inch, and knot; when crossing 2d threads over 1st, knot them. 
The 3d and 4th threads are worked the same as 1st and, 2d; 3d 



DOILIES IX DRAWN-WORK, 



125 



starts Y± inch from top edge of row. When this work is done, 
carry 2 threads across, putting the needle under each of the crossed, 
knotted threads. The corners are worked with plain, open blocks 
first, after which they are crossed and re-crossed. First row in this 
doily is ^ inch, second a very little narrower. 

No. 2 is worked with 2 rows, the 1st ^ inch; 3 strands are 
joined with a dividing thread, 2 threads each side of the middle 
dividing them and forming the foundation on which the wheels and 
figures are woven. The 2d row is ]/ 2 inch wide, consisting of 2 




Doilies in Drawn- Work, No. I, 



strands joined with a middle thread, and 1 thread each side ; smaller 
wheels and figures are worked in this row. The corners are worked 
to match the figures in the rows. There are 6 doilies in the set, or 
as many as one likes to have, and it is very easy to vary the design. 



126 



barbour's prize needle-work series, 



When I begin I scarcely know how I shall work a doily; I pull the 
threads, measure and line out the rows and blocks, buttonhole the 




Doilies in Drawn-Work, No. 2. 



raw edges, etc., and while doing this ideas come to me. For fine 
work I shall hereafter use No. 150 thread. Ecru is very effective 
on white, giving a rich appearance. 



SERVETTE. 

[Contributed by Miss M. F. Jack, ioi East Falls Street, New Castle, Pa.] 

Materials : Barbour's Irish flax thread, No. 100, and No. 70, ecru, 
3-cord, 200-yards spools, and 12-inch square soft-finish linen. 

Draw a few threads 1 % inches from edge, all around ; leave 5 
threads, draw 6, and repeat. This makes 2 rows of 5 threads of 



SERVETTE 



127 



the material, which are to be pin-stitched. Allow a space }£ inch 
all around for feather-stitching ; next, draw a circle in each corner, 
using your No. ioo spool, buttonhole-stitch around closely, work a 
design as shown in each, having opposite diagonal corners alike, 
and cut away the linen under each. This may be deferred until the 
servette is completed. Draw a band ^ inch wide along the sides 
and around the circles in corners, buttonhole-stitch closely where 
material is cut (3 places in each corner), using the No. 100 thread, 
which is used for all work except the feather-stitching, for which use 
No. 70. If preferred the size 4 floss may be used for the latter 
purpose, this having all the appearance of silk, while it launders 
beautifully. The pattern in the band is very simple, but effective, 
and the wheels and bars in corners need no description, as nearly all 
are familiar with this style of work. When completed, draw the 




Servette. 



fringe carefully. The ecru thread gives a very rich appearance. I 
have been engaged in doing this work for several years, disposing of 
it in New York and other places, and perhaps may be allowed to say 
that I buy Barbour's Irish flax thread by the box, finding it better 
adapted to my purpose than any other I have tried. 



EXPLANATION OF TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS USED 
IN BARBOUR'S PRIZE NEEDLE-WORK SERIES. 

TERMS USED IN KNITTING. 

K, knit plain. 

O, over; thread over needle, forming an extra stitch. O 2, over 
twice. 

N, narrow ; knit two stitches together. 

P, purl (or seam) ; knit with thread before needle. 

SI, n, and b, slip, narrow, and bind ; slip first stitch, narrow next 
two, and draw slipped stitch over. 

SI and b, slip and bind ; same as si, n, and b, omitting the narrow- 
ing. To cast or bind off, continue the process. 

Stars and parentheses indicate repetition; thus, * 02, n, repeat 
from * twice, and (o 2, n,) 3 times, mean the same as o 2, n, o 2, 
n, o 2, n. 

TERMS USED IN CROCHETING. 

Ch, chain; a straight series of loops, each drawn with the hook 
through the one preceding it. 

Sc, single crochet; hook through work, thread over and draw 
through work and stitch on hook at same time. 

Dc, double crochet ; hook through work, thread over, and draw 
through, over, and draw through two stitches on hook. 

Tc, treble crochet ; over, draw thread through work, over, draw 
through two stitches on hook, over, and draw through remaining 
two. 

Stc, short treble crochet; like treble, save that the thread is 
drawn through the three stitches at once. 

Dtc, double treble crochet ; thread over twice before insertion of 
hook in work, then proceed as in treble crochet. 

P, picot; a loop of chain joined by catching in first stitch of 
chain. 

Complete illustrated directions for these stitches are given in 
"No. 1 " of the Prize Series. 



Established 1784. 



JHsk for Barbour's. 

%i \z fl> font for all ww. 

3x\si8t upot? l)a&ing if. 

See that the threads you purchase hear labels similar to 
the following. THEY ARE STANDARD. 



3-CORD 200 YARDS SPOOL THREAD. 




IN 



DARK BLUE, for strong Sewing. 
\ 



WHITE, 

WD. BROWN, 

(Ecru.) 

DRABS 



For 
I Lace Making 

and 
Needlework. 




TOP LABEL. 



REVERSE LABEL 



BALL THREAD. 



COLORS. 



GREY. WHITE \ ECRU. 
I Oz. Balls. 




SIZES 



LINEN FLOSSES 

In all the Art Shades. 



ITLSTEB 

ROPE LINEN FLOSS. 

Tup: Barbour Brothers Co. 

NEW YORK. 



SlZEOO 
SHADE 

N2 3 



NOS. 16 TO 70. 
(No. 70 Fine Size.) 



BARBOUR'S STANDARD 
3-Cord Carpet Thread. 



&to*****dH&&&*-M>&«> 



* BARBOURS' IRISH FLAX. % 



■i 



Size 00, "Rope," Medium. 
4, "Etching, " Fine. 

White Flossette, * ** *** ***» 
Fine to Coarse. 



IN ALL COLORS. 



%*fc for BarBour^. 



ESTABLISHED 1784. 



BARBOUR'S 



IRISH 
FLAX 
THREADS 




Are made for every "branch of trade, and 
for every purpose xvhere Linen Threads 
are used. 

They are specially adapted and are stan- 
dard and the best for all kinds of hand 
sewing and machine work. 



Linen Threads specially made for 

Boot and Shoe flaking, 

Clothing Manufacturers, 
Carpet Sewing, 
Harness and Saddlery Making, 
Book Binding, 

Glove Making, 

Fish Nets. 



For Strength and Durability 

BARBOUR'S IRISH LINEN THREAD 

Is the best for all uses, 



Eeceived Highest Awards at 

World's Fair, Chicago, 1893. 



Special Merits. 

Distinguished Excellence. 

Uniformity. Strength. 
Adaptability. Durability. 

Barbour's Threads receive Highest Awards xvherever exhibited. 



<5)3oo), Ball, &hc| <Skeih Tl\reacU. 

IN ALL COLORS. 

For all kinds of coarse, strong seizing, and fine stitching, and for 
every kind of Art Needlework with Linen. 

For sale by all wholesale dry goods jobbing houses, shoe findings 
and saddlery hardware dealers throughout the country. 

At retail by all small-ware dealers, general stores, carpet houses, 
and shoe findings dealers. 



ffisk for JBap&outf's. 



BARBOUR'S 



ULSTER ROPE LINEN FLOSS 

is continually and rapidly advancing in popularity as its perfect 
adaptability to the varied uses of expensive silks becomes more 
strongly attested. Its smoothness and lustre is unsurpassed. It 
is especially adapted for Embroidery, for the decoration of a 
thousand and one articles for home use and adornment, and with 
equally as charming effect can be applied as readily to the uses of 
Knotting, Netting, Knitting, Crocheting, and kindred arts. For 
Slippers, Mittens, Purses, etc., it is durable, lustrous, firm, and 
far less expensive than silk, and its sale in this new field is con- 
stantly increasing. 

75 shades are now on the market, including the Newest Art 
Shades, and the old favorites ; others will be added as approved. 

Ask your Dealer for 

BARBOUR'S ULSTER ROPE LINEN FLOSS. 



TO WASH EMBROIDERY. 



Make a light suds with Ivory or other pure soap, and (particu- 
larly for the hrst laundering) cool water. Wash one article at a 
time, finishing with this before taking another. Do not rub the 
embroidery, or put soap directly upon it. Rinse carefully and 
quickly in clear, cold water, to which a little salt may be added. 
After rinsing, place between two thick towels, or in one which 
may be folded over, roll up, squeeze (in order to extract the 
moisture), then unroll, place right side down on a soft cloth or 
flannel folded in several thicknesses, lay a white cloth over the 
wrong side, and press until dry with a moderately hot iron. 



HIGHEST AWARD - WORLD'S FAIR 
ESTABLISHED 1784. 



1893, 



Gold Medal Threads are the Best. sg& Read the Record of Highest Awards, 




BARBOUR'S THREADS 



HAVE STOOD THE 
TEST FOR MORE THAN 



A CENTURY. 



THREAD WORKS! 
PATERSON, NEW JERSEY. LISBURN, IRELAND. OTTENSEN, GERMANY. 



stores: 

New York, 218 Church St. Boston, 58 South St. 

Chicago, 108 & HO Franklin St. St. Louis, 814 Lucas Ave. 

Philadelphia, 410 Arch St. Cincinnati, 118 East 6th St. 

San Francisco, 517 & 519 Market St. 

Also in London, Manchester, Glasgow, Dublin, Paris, Hamburg, Montreal, Melbourne, 
Sydney, Brussels, Amsterdam, Madrid, Milan and Naples. 

Forming collectively a Flax Thread industry employing 5000 persons or as large as any 

tvjo other Linen Thread firms. 

ASK FOR BARBOUR'S. INSIST UPON HAVING IT. SOLD EVERYWHERE. 



BARBOUR'S IRISH FLAX THREADS 

Received Highest Awards at the World's Fair, 1893. 



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STERLING & FRANCINE CLARK ART INSTITUTE 

NK9100 .B7 v.4 stack 

Bradford. Mary E./A treatise on lace-mak 



3 1962 00079 5561 



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Stoettqtft, G&aptafei&tty Tuta&ifihj. 




THE; BARBOUR BROTHERS COMPANY. 



NEW YORK, 218 CHURCH ST. 



Boston, 58 South St. Chicago, 108 & 110 Franklin St. 

Philadelphia, 410 Arch St. Cincinnati, 118 East 6th St. 

San Francisco, 517 & 519 Market St. St. Louis, 814 Lucas Ave